Arts

Pop Culture
2:19 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

So, Thor Is A Woman And Cap Is Black: Is This A Big Deal Or Not?

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 5:54 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
2:19 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

'Newburgh Sting': Terrorist Cell, Or Group Sold On A Trap By FBI?

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 3:47 pm

Filmmakers Kate Davis and David Heilbroner discuss their new documentary The Newburgh Sting, which covers the FBI investigation and conviction of four American men for plotting an act of domestic terrorism.

TED Radio Hour
7:01 am
Fri July 18, 2014

How Do Our Near-Wins Motivate Us To Keep Going?

"Success motivates us, but a near-win can propel us in an ongoing quest" β€” Sarah Lewis
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 7:08 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Champions.

About Sarah Lewis' TEDTalk

Not everyone can win the gold medal, and historian Sarah Lewis says that's a good thing. It's the near-wins and bare losses that truly motivate us to master our destinies.

About Sarah Lewis

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TED Radio Hour
7:01 am
Fri July 18, 2014

What Does It Take To Dive Into Dangerous Waters?

"When I stand on that shore, the main thing is, I want that destination, I want it" β€” Diana Nyad
Marla Aufmuth TED

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 12:35 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Champions.

About Diana Nyad's TedTalk

In pitch-black, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, hallucinating, Diana Nyad kept swimming. She describes the journey of her historic 110-mile swim from Cuba to Florida, at age 64.

About Diana Nyad

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The Two-Way
5:09 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Book News: 15 Unpublished Elmore Leonard Stories Coming Out Next Year

Author and former adman Elmore Leonard smiles during an interview at his home in Bloomfield Township, Mich., in September 2012.
Paul Sancya AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Remembrances
3:41 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Broadway Legend Elaine Stritch Dies At 89

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 6:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Broadway has lost a legend. She's Elaine Stritch, who died yesterday at the age of 89. Even recently she was gaining new fans with a guest role on the TV series "30 Rock." But as we're about to hear, Stritch made her name on the stage. Jeff Lunden has this appreciation of a singular talent.

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Goats and Soda
4:41 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Sizing Down Food Waste: What's The Worst Thing To Toss?

Throwing out a pound of boneless beef effectively wastes 24 times more calories than throwing out a pound of vegetables or grains. Egg and dairy products fall somewhere between the two extremes.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 5:11 pm

Sometimes I feel like a broken record at home: "Let's eat the leftovers for dinner, so they don't go to waste,"

But inevitably, Sunday night's pasta and meatballs get tossed out of the refrigerator to make way for Friday night's pizza.

Now scientists at the University of Minnesota offer up another reason to put those leftover meatballs in the tummy instead of the garbage: There are hidden calories in the beef that go to waste when you toss it.

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Book Reviews
3:29 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

William T. Vollmann's Ghost Stories Are Frighteningly Self-Indulgent

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 6:40 pm

In certain writers, the sense of profound moral inquiry is like a bell tower in a country church: You can see it from a long way off, and even when it's not making a sound, you can hear its reverberation. William T. Vollmann's work is like that: Regardless of his subject, he writes from a place of grave moral seriousness. In his masterpiece, the 2005 novel Europe Central, he wrestled the 20th century into one huge, luminous tome that bristled with insight and dread.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

'I Origins': There's More Than One 'I' In 'Ridiculous'

In I Origins, Michael Pitt (left) plays a molecular biologist who becomes emotionally and philosophically entranced by free-spirited "Sofi" (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) and her speckled eyes.
Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Viewers of earnest sci-fi dramas like I Origins are required to suspend disbelief, but the scripters of such movies have responsibilities, too. They can't introduce ideas so ridiculous, or suddenly twist their premises so illogically, that audiences are fatally distracted.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

In 'Mood Indigo,' A Luscious And Literal Feast Of Feeling

Set in surreal Paris, Mood Indigo, based on the French novel of the same title by Boris Vian, follows Colin, played by Romain Duris, as he falls into a whirlwind courtship hoping to find love.
Drafthouse Films

About halfway through Mood Indigo, a film of inexhaustible creativity directed by Michel Gondry, the apartment that Colin (Romain Duris) and ChloΓ© (Audrey Tautou) call home begins to change dramatically β€” the ceiling starts closing in, and a thick layer of cobweb starts covering the walls and windows. "My place is doing the same thing, but I think it's an illusion," says a friend when she drops in for a visit. "As you go through life, places seem smaller."

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Theater
2:53 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Actress Elaine Stritch, 'Her Own Greatest Character,' Dies At 89

Stritch first appeared on Broadway in 1944 β€” and was still performing occasionally even at age 89. She is pictured above in 1955.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:00 am

Elaine Stritch β€” one of Broadway's boldest and brassiest performers β€” has died. With that gravelly voice β€” and those long legs β€” and that utter command of the stage, Stritch was a bona fide Broadway star. Not as a classic leading lady, necessarily, but as the hardened-yet-vulnerable performer audiences couldn't forget. Stritch died of natural causes Thursday morning at her home in Birmingham, Mich. She was 89.

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The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Actress And Singer Elaine Stritch Has Died

Elaine Stritch in her final engagement at the Cafe Carlyle in New York in 2013. Stritch bade farewell to New York with a series of concerts last spring; she died Thursday in Michigan.
Walter McBride/The O M Co. AP

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 1:45 pm

Elaine Stritch, an actress whose talent led to a substantial and long career on Broadway and in cabarets, died Thursday at age 89. She had been living in her native Birmingham, Mich., where she moved last year after spending decades in New York. Stritch's publicist says she died of natural causes; her health had been failing in recent months.

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Books
12:33 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

'Trans Bodies, Trans Selves': A Modern Manual By And For Trans People

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 1:18 pm

The growing number of people who identify as transgender is raising a lot of interesting and complicated questions about gender identity.

The new book Trans Bodies, Trans Selves is a collection of essays describing the varied experiences of transgender people β€” and the social, political and medical issues they face. It's written by and for transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

The idea was inspired by the groundbreaking 1970s feminist health manual Our Bodies, Ourselves.

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Arts & Life
10:23 am
Thu July 17, 2014

How That Pinkish Goo Called Silly Putty Came Out Of Its Shell

One of the wonders of Silly Putty.
Tom Copeland AP

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 11:29 am

Silly Putty abides.

While it may have escaped the notice of anyone under 40 years old, the pinkish goo in the red plastic egg stomped into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 2001, where, with more than 300 million units or 4,000 tons sold since 1950, it's not likely to be supplanted by video games anytime soon.

Backed by a certain design simplicity, the 0.47 ounces of putty can be balled up and bounced, used to pull pictures off of comics and newsprint paper, pick up lint and pet hair, and be used for a variety of physical therapies.

So, silly? Hardly.

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Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Really Hard Edition 2: Part 3

In the final segment, we pull out all the stops for a Very Important Puzzler and some special musical guests. In "Accidental Science," we challenge Radiolab host in the puzzle hot seat for a quiz about unintentional scientific discoveries. Then, They Might Be Giants devise a game literally filled with trick questions, appropriately titled, "Wrong, Wrong, Wrong."

Ask Me Another
8:52 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Really Hard Edition 2: Part 2

Host Ophira Eisenberg and puzzle editor Art Chung continue the hour with a trio of games that push the limits on your ability to recall cultural references. In "Nick Names," identify famous people and fictional characters named "Nick." (See what we did there?) Sing along with house musician Jonathan Coulton in "Jingle All The Way," as he performs favorite commercial jingles...in Italian. Plus, insert comic strip characters into your favorite novels in "Literary Comic Strips."

Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Really Hard Edition 2: Part 1

In this hour, take on some of our trickiest games in recent memory with host Ophira Eisenberg and puzzle editor Art Chung. Do your best to remember two things at once in "International Doppelgangers" as puzzle guru John Chaneski asks you to combine celebrities with the names of countries, like that South American star, Argentina Fey. Then, try a twist on the mash-up in "Russian Dolls" by "nesting," or placing words inside a different one to make a longer word β€” putting a LAMB inside of a CAKE creates a CLAMBAKE.

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The Two-Way
6:02 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Book News: Apple May Pay Consumers $400 Million In E-Book Settlement

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu July 17, 2014

A Supernatural Family Reunion In 'The Book Of Life'

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 6:25 am

One upon a time, historian Deborah Harkness was doing research at Oxford's Bodleian Library when she accidentally discovered a lost book that had belonged to 16th-century astronomer John Dee. A few years later, her first novel, A Discovery of Witches, told the story of Diana Bishop, a historian who accidentally discovers a lost manuscript called Ashmole 782 in the Bodleian Library, and realizes it's a magical text of crucial importance to the daemons and vampires that crowd the streets of Oxford β€” not to mention the witches (a group to which Diana reluctantly belongs).

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Code Switch
10:51 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Viola Davis Gets Groundbreaking Role As ABC Bets On Diversity

Actress Viola Davis speaks about her new ABC show How to Get Away with Murder at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in Los Angeles.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 11:49 am

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The Two-Way
5:54 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Book News: Harper Lee Says New Biography Is Unauthorized

Author Harper Lee smiles during a 2007 ceremony in Montgomery, Ala.
Rob Carr AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:51 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed July 16, 2014

'Pirates In The Heartland': At Least This Review Is Safe For Work

cover detail

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:16 am

There's a line pop culture likes to flirt with. It's the line between naughty and nasty, between seamy and sordid, between icky and "come on, really, I just ate lunch." Back in the mid-'60s, when ladies always wore stockings and gentlemen still wore hats, S. Clay Wilson left that line in his rearview mirror.

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Parallels
1:44 am
Wed July 16, 2014

The Grandes Dames Of The Sea Ply The Tuscan Waters

The vintage boats of Argentario Sailing Week, some more than a century old, plied the waters off Italy's Tuscan coast, known for its ideal sailing conditions.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:48 am

A most unusual regatta recently took place off Tuscany's southern coast: Vintage sailboats known as the Grandes Dames of the Sea β€” some more than 100 years old β€” plied the waters of Porto Santo Stefano, a fishing village known for ideal sailing conditions

Among the more than 40 yachts was one, Manitou, that was known as "the floating White House" when her owner was President John F. Kennedy.

The boat is made of mahogany β€” a 62-foot boat that weighs 30 tons, skipper Alex Tillery says proudly. In contrast, he says, a modern 62-footer would probably weigh 8 tons.

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The Salt
2:29 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

U.S. Customs Seize Giant African Snails Bound For Dinner Plates

A single snail from an air cargo shipment of 67 live snails that arrived at Los Angeles International Airport on July 1. Officials said that the 35 pounds of snails arrived from Nigeria along with paperwork stating they were for human consumption.
Greg Bartman AP

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 10:21 am

Oh no! Snails are getting a bad name in the U.S.

I'm not talking about the delicate garlic-and-butter escargots that the French favor and savor.

It's giant African land snails, also known as Archachatina marginata, banana rasp snails or a number of other names they go by.

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Author Interviews
1:03 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

An Army Wife Charts Her Struggles In 'No Man's War'

Angela Ricketts, whose husband deployed eight times over 22 years, says she had to get over resentment around parenting their three kids alone while he was gone.
Courtesy of Counterpoint Press

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 1:52 pm

People often expect military wives to be strong and stoic. But in her new memoir, No Man's War: Irreverent Confessions of an Infantry Wife, Angela Ricketts writes about the difficulties she faced during her husband's deployments β€” including the stresses it put on their marriage and on raising their three children.

She also writes about the toll of always bracing herself for the next goodbye.

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Monkey See
9:51 am
Tue July 15, 2014

At This Summer's TV Press Tour, A Resounding Sense Of 'Meh'

Executive producer Anne Heche (left) and actress Kate Walsh speak at the Bad Judge panel during the 2014 Summer Television Critics Association in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 10:30 am

There's a widespread belief that critics hate everything, revel in hating everything, and cannot be pleased. It's widespread and wrong, though.

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The Two-Way
5:47 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Book News: Pakistani Civil Servant Who Published Debut Novel At 79 Dies

Novelist Jamil Ahmad. His wife, Helga, is in the background.
Jim Wildman NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue July 15, 2014

En Garde! 'Traitor's Blade' Delivers Adventure At Swordpoint

Jo Fletcher Books

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 11:19 am

When fantasy has gotten so grim and dark that the term "grimdark" has been coined to describe certain authors, things may have gone slightly overboard. With Traitor's Blade, the first installment of a new fantasy series called the Greatcoat Quartet, author Sebastien de Castell seems to be taking a stand against the grimdark wave. Unlike the bleak, bloody work of George R.R. Martin and Joe Abercrombie, Traitor's Blade is a swashbuckling romp packed with charisma, camaraderie, quick wit and even quicker swordplay.

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Book Your Trip
1:29 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Travel Disasters Bring Out The Best, The Worst ... And The Cannibalism

"When there is danger, when there is destruction, we kind of feel like we're on the edge of life, fully alive, and that can really bring out some strong prose," says author Mitchell Zuckoff.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 12:41 pm

Author Sarah Lotz is terrified of flying, so naturally every time she gets on a plane she imagines the worst. "I imagine how it's going to smell if things start burning," she says. "I imagine the thunk of luggage falling out of the compartments at the top. ... I imagine it all in absolutely horrible detail."

All those horrible imaginings came in handy when Lotz was writing her new book The Three β€” the story of three children who are the only survivors of four separate plane crashes that occur in different parts of the world on the same day.

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Code Switch
1:28 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Was The Green Turtle The First Asian-American Superhero?

The Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel by Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew, revives the comic book hero the Green Turtle.
Sonny Liew Courtesy of First Second Books

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 9:39 am

For the first time since the 1940s, the Green Turtle is returning to comic bookshelves. The long-forgotten character has been resurrected in The Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel about what many comic fans consider the first Asian-American superhero.

"He's like a classic, American World War II hero," says cartoonist Gene Luen Yang, who collaborated with illustrator Sonny Liew on The Shadow Hero.

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