Arts

Arts and culture

Celebrity Foods

Jul 1, 2015

In this punny round, contestants are described famous people who have food as part or all of their last names. For example: "Wesley Crusher had to leave when the Enterprise went gluten-free and no one would stand by this actor." Answer: Wil Wheaton.

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Don't Be So Literal

Jul 1, 2015

We describe film titles literally, like the 1999 film Richard III, Louis XIV and Tutankhamen, aka Three Kings.

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Your Answer Is Some Kind Of Land

Jul 1, 2015

Jonathan Coulton revisits the John Mayer song "Your Body is a Wonderland" to be about other things that end in "-land."

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Drive My Car

Jul 1, 2015

"For sale: classic Delorean with pre-installed Flux Capacitor. Can go from 0 to 88 mph in a flash. Runs on garbage. Perfect for time travel." See if you can identify the fictional rides for sale in this game.

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Water World

Jul 1, 2015

In this final round, questions are about words or phrases that include the word "water." You might talk about the answers while standing around the device for dispensing refrigerated liquid, usually in an office.

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Pinpointing the most important conversation in Magic Mike XXL is, admittedly, a little like pinpointing the most important zoological computer model in Jurassic World, but let's do it anyway.

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For This Nostalgia Trip, 'We Don't Need Roads'

Jul 1, 2015

There's no question the Back to the Future trilogy has entrenched itself in the collective pop-culture imagination for even longer than Reagan could have imagined when he adopted the movie's catchphrase about not needing roads to appeal to The Youth. It's been a video game (twice), a theme park ride three times over, and it's common knowledge even for a generation who wasn't born until after the third installment was released.

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What's the epitome of summer for a lot of Americans? It's communing around a grill, with friends and family, waiting for a slab of meat to cook to juicy perfection.

You're an American in London. You've visited Buckingham Palace, Big Ben and the Tower of London, but there's one more thing you want to check off your to-do list: tea.

No, not just any tea. We're talking a good, old-fashioned English tea time, with finger sandwiches, dainty china cups and all the formality a Downton Abbey lover could wish for.

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In a promotion announced Tuesday, the American Ballet Theatre named Misty Copeland as the first black female principal dancer in its 75-year history. Copeland had previously been a soloist with the ABT, the premiere dance company in the U.S.

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Drawn and Quarterly, the Montreal-based publisher of comics and graphic novels, began life as a magazine, released in April of 1990. That first issue served as a de facto mission statement, laying out what the company would one day achieve on a grander scale – and what it would strive always to avoid.

Everyone agrees on one thing: On the night of Aug. 18, 2006, Dwayne Buckle catcalled Patreese Johnson.

Johnson and six of her friends, all young lesbians of color, were walking down Sixth Avenue in New York City's West Village to hang out at the clubs in one of the gayest neighborhoods in America. That's when Buckle, a then-28-year-old black filmmaker, called out to Johnson, who was 19 at the time, with an obscene comment.

"Mister, I'm gay," Johnson says she told Buckle, trying to wave him off.

"Life is a funny thing, you know," says a character in Naomi Jackson's The Star Side of Bird Hill. "Just when you think you know what you're doing, which way you're headed, the target moves." He makes a good point — our lives have a way of taking detours without our consent, and the result can be like riding in a car that drives itself.

'Philosopher Kings' Leaves Plato's Republic Far Behind

Jun 30, 2015

Jo Walton's The Just City, which came out in January and which I utterly adored, ends on a wicked cliff-hanger: The real-world version of Plato's Republic that scholars and philosophers from different times and places tried to build has fractured along its fault-lines; all is chaos, uncertainty, and recrimination and we don't know what's going to happen to our (by now deeply beloved) point-of-view characters.

Ah, the bread basket. You sit down for a nice meal out, and there it appears: piping hot, giving off a waft of yeasty divinity.

Who can resist?

There's a reason this age-old tradition prevails. Even in the era of paleo and gluten-free, there are still hordes of us who will gladly nosh on crusty, chewy, soul-warming bread.

But the downside may be more than just some extra calories. Turns out, eating all those carbs before a meal can amp up our appetites and spike our blood sugar.

During our recent time with charming Bostonian librarian Margaret Willison, we managed to sit her down for a chat about audiobooks. We discovered that while I am a frequent listener to a variety of kinds of books (as I wrote about recently), Margaret uses them in a very different way that might appeal to some of you who like to revisit and reread your favorites.

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On-air challenge: For every word provided (all starting with the letter "W"), give a proverb or saying that contains that word.

Last week's challenge: Take the phrase "I am a monarch." Rearrange the 11 letters to name a world leader who was not a monarch, but who ruled with similar authority. Who is it?

Answer: Chairman Mao.

Winner: David Slobodin of Asheville, North Carolina.

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This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: Making delicious, fall-off-the-bone baby back ribs in only about an hour — with a surprising piece of kitchen equipment.

Milan Kundera has made a career of writing about insignificance.

Mary Anna King grew up in a housing project in southern New Jersey, with her older brother Jacob and struggling parents.

"When you're struggling financially and you're living in poverty ... it takes twice as much effort to do anything," she tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

Her parents went on to have five more kids, all girls, and despite her mother's best efforts to keep the family together, all five girls were ultimately given up for adoption.

Step aside, Peter Parker: There's a new Spider-Man joining the Marvel Universe.

According to Sports Illustrated, more than half of all NBA players are broke within five years of retirement. Most of the players come into professional sports totally unequipped to handle their own windfalls like cars, houses and fancy clothes.

Former NBA star Adonal Foyle is trying to help.

He offers financial advice for current and future professional athletes in his book Winning the Money Game: Lessons Learned from the Financial Fouls of Pro Athletes.

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