Arts

Arts and culture

Sightseething

Jun 24, 2016

From the La Brea Tar Pits to the Venice Boardwalk, Los Angeles is full of disappointing tourist attractions. And, according to the Internet, so is the rest of the world! Identify famous destinations based on some one-star Internet reviews.

Heard On Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, 'Weird Al' Yankovic: 10 Out Of 10 Goldblums

An Emotional Ending

Jun 24, 2016

We're closing this show like any good TV show or movie — with "An Emotional Ending." Every answer in this round contains a word that is also a feeling or emotion. If we said, "It's an app where avians are flung across the screen at piggies," you'd answer, "Angry Birds."

Heard On Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, 'Weird Al' Yankovic: 10 Out Of 10 Goldblums

This Is Our Administrative Assistant Day!

Jun 24, 2016

Actor Jeff Goldblum is a busy guy. From hunting down dinosaurs in Jurassic Park to fighting aliens in Independence Day, he has done it all. But, as he tells host Ophira Eisenberg, these days he is learning the ropes of a completely new role-- father to his one-year-old son, Charlie Ocean, who was born, believe it or not, on July 4th.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Michael Herr, whose depictions of Vietnam redefined the genre of war reporting, died Thursday at a hospital near his home in upstate New York after what his publisher said was a long illness. He was 76.

When Herr left to cover the Vietnam War for Esquire, he didn't bring a great amount of journalistic experience. At 27, he'd been an amateur film critic, written some travel pieces and had worked on Syracuse University's literary magazine. But by the time his book Dispatches came out 10 years later, none of that mattered.

President Obama is designating a new national monument around the Stonewall Inn, the birthplace of the modern gay rights movement.

The Stonewall National Monument in New York City will be the first addition to the National Park System specifically highlighting the history of the LGBT community.

It's a pleasure every week to take a little time to talk about culture, and it's especially a pleasure when we get to welcome a new member to our fourth chair. This week, it's Daisy Rosario of Latino USA, who you might have heard previously during a discussion with me about the upcoming Gilmore Girls return.

How Are Health Workers Putting An End To Guinea Worms?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour Episode Nudge

Professor Richard Thaler returns to the show to talk about how a nudge has essentially eradicated guinea worm disease in Africa.

About Richard Thaler

Thaler studies behavioral economics and finance as well as the psychology of decision-making.

Can Coding Help Girls Take Risks?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Nudge

About Reshma Saujani's TED Talk:

Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani offers a creative solution to gently push young women into making bold decisions. Her program aims to close the gender gap in computer science.

About Reshma Saujani

How Can A Nudge Save A Life?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode Nudge

About Sendhil Mullainathan's TED Talk

We have the treatments to end health problems like infant diarrhea. Sendhil Mullainathan says the "last mile" nudge is to encourage people to use them.

About Sendhil Mullainathan

Sendhil Mullainathan is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Should We Stop Telling Kids They're Smart?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Nudge

About Carol Dweck's TED Talk

Carol Dweck finds that the words adults use to describe kids' progress affects the children's belief in their own potential.

About Carol Dweck

Can Mindfulness Help You Quit Smoking?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Nudge

About Judson Brewer's TED Talk

Psychiatrist Judson Brewer describes how patients who practice simple mindfulness techniques can kick unhealthy habits.

About Judson Brewer

Psychiatrist Judson Brewer studies how mindfulness affects addiction.

What Is A Nudge?

Jun 24, 2016

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Nudge

How can a simple adjustment - a nudge - change our behavior for the better? Professor Richard Thaler says his "nudge theory" can make it easier for people to save money, eat healthily and more.

About Richard Thaler

University of Chicago professor Richard Thaler studies behavioral economics and finance as well as the psychology of decision-making.

Taika Waititi is an actor and director whose offbeat sense of humor is well-known in his native New Zealand. And while he doesn't enjoy the same recognition in the U.S., he does have something of a cult following here.

There's an explosion of interest in friendly bacteria.

Beneficial microorganisms, as we've reported, can help us digest food, make vitamins, and protect us against harmful pathogens.

As this idea gains traction, so too does the popularity of fermented foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut and kimchi.

Though the science is tricky, researchers are learning more about how this ancient technique for preserving food may also help promote good health.

An ancient variety of squash that was all but lost to history is now being rediscovered. Native Americans in the Great Lakes region have cultivated this squash for centuries, and now tribes are sharing the seeds with each other and with small farmers to bring the plant back.

Eighth Day Farm in Holland, Mich., is among those that acquired seeds from this mystery squash. And the farm's Sarah Hofman-Graham says they didn't know what to expect when they planted it last year.

The Shallows, the second-best aquatic adventure now playing at a theater near you, looks at first glance like an attempt to restore a modicum of respectability to the genre Jaws wrought. (I mean shark-flicks specifically, not the predatory, invasive species of the sensation-driven summer blockbuster.)

In the shimmering Tinseltown gothic of Nicolas Winding Refn's The Neon Demon, beauty is a commodity both precious and volatile, subject to runway trends and the ravages of age, with just a blemish, a wrinkle, or a sliver of fat separating today's "It Girl" from tomorrow's bus back to Indiana.

A wannabe-gangster foster kid develops an uneasy bond with a reluctant parental figure as they trek through the New Zealand bush in Hunt for the Wilderpeople, a familiar sort of coming-of-age movie made more interesting by the uniqueness of its setting and its off-kilter Kiwi humor. The film has already broken box office records in its native New Zealand. It's a bit too tame to catch fire here in the same way, however, despite writer-director Taika Waititi's growing track record as a cult comedy hero.

Is there anything to be learned from watching the same scenario play out multiple times? Regular viewers of Hong Sang-soo's psychologically acute work have probably been asking themselves that for years, as many of the Korean filmmaker's movies spin variations on a single setup: a middle-aged art-film director dallies, often inconclusively, with a pretty young woman (or two).

The great critic Robert Warshaw once pegged the gangster movie as "the no to the great American yes that is stamped so large over our official culture."

The mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando has led to a revival of the debate over assault weapons, but journalist Evan Osnos says the real growth in gun ownership is from small, concealed handguns.

"Something really profound has changed in the way that we use guns," Osnos tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "Concealed carry, as it's known, is now legal in all 50 states."

The rant is a staple of sports fandom. At Thanksgiving, at the office, in bars, via text, on Twitter — wherever sports fans go, rants go, too.

It makes sense, then, that the biggest headline out of Wednesday's premiere of Bill Simmons' new HBO talk show Any Given Wednesday was a sports rant. And it wasn't from the first guest, Charles Barkley. It was from the second guest, Ben Affleck.

"No matter how long they've been there, the people who live out here believe that whatever life demands of them they can meet it on their own," writes Larry Watson in his new novel, As Good as Gone. "Here" is the badlands of eastern Montana, a famously desolate and unforgiving region; those who inhabit it tend to learn self-reliance quickly, and by necessity.

The moment my boyfriend — now husband — and I got serious about our future together, my father-in-law got serious about teaching me to cook Indian cuisine. My boyfriend was already skilled in the kitchen. But Dr. Jashwant Sharma wanted extra assurance that the dishes from his native country would always have a place in our home. Plus, as he told me recently, he thought I'd like it.

"We mix four, five, six different spices in a single dish. These create a taste and aroma that you don't get in any other food. People exposed to it usually like it," he said.

Actor Tony Hale is really comfortable playing doormat characters. The two roles he's gotten the most attention for — Gary Walsh on HBO's Veep and Buster Bluth on Fox's Arrested Development — both fall squarely into that category.

"I guess I just do emasculated and meek very well," Hale tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

For this week's episode, I sat down with my Code Switch teammate Gene Demby to dig into one of our favorite topics: rep sweats. It's the feeling of anxiety that can come with watching TV shows or movies starring people who look like you, especially when People Who Look Like You tend not to get a lot of screen time.

Things are not what they seem: That idea is the building block of thriller and horror novels. Paul Tremblay exploited uncertainty to its utmost in his breakthrough book, last year's Bram Stoker Award-winning A Head Full of Ghosts, in which a teenage girl shows all the telltale signs of demonic possession.

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