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STATE OF THE ARTS: Fab Lab

El Paso’s Fab Lab has a new home in downtown El Paso. Located on the ground level of the new ArtSpace lofts, their core belief is that the tools and resources to actualize creative ideas should be available to as many community members as possible.

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Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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Recently there has been a rise in antibiotic resistant bacteria. In order to address this rising concern a new approach has been developed, antisense antibiotics.  Dr. Bruce Geller, professor of microbiology at Oregon State University is one of the leading researchers in this new approach and he discusses what exactly are antisense antibiotics. 

http://microbiology.science.oregonstate.edu/content/bruce-geller

Aired March 19, 2017

Winston Groom is a best selling author of sixteen books including the New York Times bestseller "Forrest Gump" which stayed on the list for 21 weeks and was adapted into the film "Forrest Gump" starring Tom Hanks. Along with being a novelist Groom is also a renowned author of history. In his latest novel, "El Paso", Groom melds fiction with history telling the tale of a thrill-seeking Bostonian railroad tycoon who finds himself pitted against Pancho Villa amongst the backdrop of the Mexican Revolution. 

http://www.winstongroom.com/

Aired March 19, 2017

Stephen Kessler is a poet and translator. Through him and his translations the works of poets such as Julio Cortázar and Jorge Luis Borges have been able to live on and shared with a new generation of readers. He mostly recently translated the poems of Julio Cortázar, whom he personally knew, in  "Save Twilight: Selected Poems". Kessler is an expert translator able to capture the essence of Cortázar's poems without getting lost in translation. 

http://www.stephenkessler.com/index.html

Aired March 19, 2017

On Thursday, March 23rd and Saturday, March 25th, 2017 the El Paso Opera will present Gioachino Rossini’s Cinderella at the Abraham Chavez Theatre.

The El Paso Opera production will follow world-renowned director Garnett Bruce’s adaptation of Rossini’s 1816 fairytale Cinderella and will be set in 1930s Hollywood. The opera is sung in Italian with both English and Spanish projected subtitles provided. Here to tell us all about it is Artistic Director David Holloway.

Montoya-Grams is the brainchild of Indie/Latin band ,Fatigo's, frontman, Mike Montoya. The concept is simple, you fill out a questionnaire based on your loved one, and Mike Montoya gets to work on creating a song written and recorded completely from scratch, tailored to the person's taste in music, known as a Montoya-Gram. Here to tell us about writing songs about and for people he’s never met is Mike Montoya.

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Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

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Updated at 11:42 a.m. ET

With the stroke of a pen on Tuesday, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson is expected to separate a holiday that has for decades celebrated both Martin Luther King Jr. and Gen. Robert E. Lee in the state.

Under the bill that Hutchinson says he'll sign into law, King will have the third Monday of January entirely to himself, as dictated by federal law; Lee will now be commemorated in a state holiday on the second Saturday of October.

Second-seed Duke was knocked out of the men's NCAA basketball tournament on Sunday by No. 7 seed South Carolina, 88-81.

The game was played in Greenville, S.C., effectively giving the South Carolina Gamecocks home-court advantage.

After the game, Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said South Carolina's physical nature wore down his team in the second half. "That's the most physical team we've faced all year," he said.

At a ceremony in New York on Thursday, one of America's most celebrated writers had a new reason to celebrate. Louise Erdrich won the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction for her novel LaRose, the story of an accidental shooting — and the fraught tale of family and reparation that follows.

Derek Walcott's work explored the beauty of his Caribbean homeland and its brutal colonial history. The prolific, Nobel Prize-winning poet and playwright died Friday at his home in St. Lucia. He was 87.

Walcott wrote dozens of books of poetry and plays, among them his epic poem Omeros and his Obie-winning drama, Dream on Monkey Mountain.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the U.S. doesn't want to take military action against North Korea, but "all of the options are on the table" if a serious threat arises. Tillerson made his frank remarks in a visit to South Korea on Friday, a day after saying diplomatic efforts "have failed" to persuade North Korea to abandon its nuclear program.

Tillerson's Asia tour began in Japan and will end in China. The top American diplomat is traveling without a press contingent.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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This spring, the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., will host a three-day event co-hosted by a business group.

That's not unusual. But here's what is: The group's chair founded the company that paid President Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, for lobbying work that may have benefited the Turkish government.

This mashup of money involving Turks, Flynn and Trump has concerned ethics experts who worry about a "pay-to-play" atmosphere in Washington. Here are the basics:

Nescafe Opens A Nap Cafe In Tokyo

7 hours ago

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Airline passengers coming to the U.S. on direct flights from eight majority-Muslim nations must now place most electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and cameras, in checked baggage under stepped-up security measures, Trump administration officials said.

Passengers can still carry smartphones into the plane's cabin, but nothing larger, the officials added.

The measures took effect Tuesday morning and cover about 50 incoming flights a day from the eight countries — Jordan, Egypt, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates.

Many people these days might be getting worked up about the fact that President Trump owns a lot of businesses. Not Chris Kinney.

"I think this country really needs to be run more like a business at this point," says the 51-year-old Lino Lakes, Minn., resident, a former business owner who fixes printers for a living. The United States faces a lot of serious problems, such as the growing federal deficit, and the fact that Trump brings a businessman's sensibility to solving them is a plus, Kinney says.

The Affordable Care Act's tax penalty for people who opt out of health insurance is one of the most loathed parts of the law, so it is no surprise that Republicans are keen to abolish it. But the penalty, also called the individual mandate, plays a vital function: nudging healthy people into the insurance markets, where their premiums help pay for the cost of care for the sick. Republican lawmakers think they have a better alternative.

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The six-episode podcast Missing Richard Simmons dropped its final episode on Monday, two days ahead of schedule. For a project nominally devoted to finding out more about what happened to onetime fitness guru Richard Simmons, it wasn't very satisfying by that standard. Host Dan Taberski concluded, in effect, that Richard Simmons was safe and physically healthy and had withdrawn voluntarily from public life without much fanfare, which is ... pretty much what we already knew. That's what Simmons had said in a call to Today that Taberski played again and again.

When Nell Stevens, then a newly minted MFA, was offered the possibility of a three-month grant to go anywhere in the world to write, she pounced. Eager to avoid distractions and desperate to find something to write about, the 27-year-old Brit chose the weather-lashed, aptly named Bleaker Island, in the Falklands. "I do not want to have a nice time," she explains. "What I want — what I need — is to have the kind of time that I can convert into a book."

It sounds unbelievable to a lot of us, but for some people, their early 20s are the age when things start to come together. They graduate college, find a fulfilling job, marry their sweetheart and start a family.

The last time I talked with Paul Watson, I reached him aboard a Canadian Coast Guard Icebreaker in the Arctic, via satellite phone.

"The captain was glaring at me because we talked for a long time," Watson remembers with a laugh.

That was three years ago, and Watson, a columnist for The Toronto Star, was alongside archaeologists who had just located one of two sunken ships lost in the Franklin Expedition, back in the 1840s.

Comedian Iliza Shlesinger has a lot to say about what it's like to be a lady these days — and what things could have been like in the past.

"Do you think for a second, that if women were physically stronger than men, we would have waited for the right to vote?" she asks in her latest Netflix special, Confirmed Kills. She goes on to imagine a "jacked up housewife" in 1910, with a "shaker of horse testosterone and creatine," shoving her husband out of the way because "mama's going to the polls."

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What To Do In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Sep 8, 2012

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now to an odd potential problem here.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE WALKING DEAD")

SIMON: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging all Americans to...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Prepare for the zombie apocalypse.

SIMON: At least a zombie visit. They even put a to-do list on their "Public Health Matters" blog. The guidelines don't much resemble the rules of survival in the movie "Zombieland."

(SOUNDBITE OF THE MOVIE, "ZOMBIELAND")

Inside Security Council Talks On Syria

Sep 8, 2012

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Last week, the French ended their rotation at the head of United Nations Security Council. Their permanent representative, Ambassador Gerard Araud, had one preeminently difficult issue on his agenda while in charge. And, of course, that was the question of what to do about Syria. Ambassador Araud joins us from his office in New York City. Mr. Ambassador, thanks very much for being with us.

AMBASSADOR GERARD ARAUD: Good morning.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Democrats in North Carolina are hoping to extend the momentum of the convention, organizing to get out the vote in November. President Obama narrowly won the state four years ago, but recent polls have shown Mitt Romney now ahead. The weak economy still looms over their organizing efforts. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

The Burn Of Unemployment Still Stings New Hampshire

Sep 8, 2012

Transcript

JOSH ROGERS, BYLINE: I'm Josh Rogers in Concord, New Hampshire. Pretty much every poll in this race shows the Granite State as a tossup. Economic issues tend to dominate here, and even though New Hampshire has weathered the recession relatively well - unemployment stands at just 5.2 percent - you wouldn't know it by talking to voters at Manchester's Red Arrow Diner.

NEAL POITRAS: I ran into a tough situation where I actually bought a house five years ago and I just recently sold it for a $46,000 loss.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A case of unshuffled card decks has riled up casino owners and players in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Fourteen gamblers at the Golden Nugget there raked in more than $1.5 million playing a game called mini-baccarat in April. But they didn't have Lady Luck to thank so much as a technical malfunction. The players realized after a few hands that they were being dealt cards in the exact same sequence.

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

Stephen Tobolowsky calls his book, The Dangerous Animals Club, a group of "pieces." They are partly essays, partly short stories, partly memoir. They are anecdotes, stories and insights that are shuffled in and out of order, like cards in a deck.

The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

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