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STATE OF THE ARTS: Author Isabel Quintero & Illustrator Zeke Pena

Author Isabel Quintero and illustrator Zeke Peña have come together to collaborate on the book Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide, from Getty Publications. The book is “an evocative and poetic graphic biography about renowned Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide and her adventures around the world.”

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Latest from KTEP

Michael Strano is the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We discussed his latest research interests and discoveries, which include his ongoing research into Plant Nanobionics. 

It's been almost a century since she wrote her first novel, but Agatha Christie continues to captivate her readers with her mystery novels. This week, we visited with New York Time's best-selling author Laura Thompson to discuss her latest work, Agatha Christie: A Mysterious Life. 

Reach Out

Vivimarie VanderPoorten is a Sri Lankan poet. Her book Nothing Prepares You won the 2007 Gratiaen Prize.She was also awarded the 2009 SAARC Poetry Award in Delhi. This week, we had the privilege of speaking with VanderPoorten about her third collection of poems, Borrowed Dust. 

Warmer weather brings all sorts of visitors to your garden - some good, some are pesky. This week, we shared tips on how to control some of those unwanted guests. 

-ORIGINALLY AIRED MARCH 14, 2015-

Host Charles Horak talks with journalist and author, Mark Harris, about his latest book Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. The books follows 5 acclaimed Hollywood directors who covered WWII - John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens. Mark explains what the directors were expecting when they went to war, and how they changed when they returned.

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The Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia has seen two massive bleaching events over the span of two years. And that's led to a widespread die-off of the corals, according to a new study.

Each night, all over the ocean, swarms of animals wriggle and kick their way from deep below the waves to feed at the surface. Each creature is tiny — less than a centimeter long, and sometimes much smaller — and there are trillions of them.

New research suggests this nightly migration might be helping mix the ocean on a grand scale, sending columns of water down as the animals swim up. It's a radical idea, and one that is just starting to take hold among scientists who study the oceans and who have long assumed that wind and waves, not animals, are the drivers of ocean-mixing.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Starbucks is closing thousands of stores across the U.S. on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education geared toward preventing discrimination in our stores," the company said in a statement.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

One person died after a Southwest Airlines plane experienced serious engine trouble Tuesday and was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia. Seven other people on Flight 1380 were injured. It is the first U.S. airline fatality since 2009.

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Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday after a series of hospitalizations. She was the wife of former President George H.W. Bush and the mother of former President George W. Bush.

Born Barbara Pierce in New York City, Bush initially thought she'd grow up to become a nurse. "But then I met that marvelous George Bush and the nursing went out the window," she told Fresh Air in 1994.

Remembering Barbara Bush

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Former First Lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday. She was 92.

After several hospitalizations, Bush opted to begin receiving “comfort care” earlier this week, according to a statement from the family.

The Brave Act Of Casting A Ballot

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Voter suppression is a very real problem in the U.S. According to the Brennan Center For Justice at New York University, “lawmakers in eight states have introduced at least 16 bills making it harder to vote, and 35 restrictive bills in 14 states have carried over from previous legislative sessions.

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The U.S. loses as much as $600 billion a year through intellectual property theft: Semiconductors, self-driving cars, sunglasses, and software.

China is the biggest culprit. It has planted moles in U.S. companies and hacked into computer systems to steal secrets. Boeing, Apple, Dupont, Ford have all gone after China for intellectual property theft.

President Trump wants to punish China by throwing up tariffs, but economist Ken Rogoff says we'd do better to turn the other cheek. It may not be a satisfying strategy, he says, but it's a lot more profitable in the long run.

For decades, China has been one of the most difficult places to sell a car, and one of the most lucrative.

Nearly 29 million vehicles were sold in China in 2017, according to the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers. That's 11 million more than what sold in the U.S. last year, according to Wards, an auto data tracking firm.

This week, Chinese officials announced they're planning to relax some rules specifically for electric cars.

Here are some of the barriers that makes selling a car in China problematic.

1. The 50/50 rule

For four years, the United States and the European Union have imposed sanctions on Russia over its aggression in Ukraine. The measures restrict travel and target assets of key individuals linked to the Kremlin.

But Ukraine says there's one major confidant of Russian President Vladimir Putin whom the Europeans should consider sanctioning, but haven't — former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder.

Days after it was revealed that Fox News host Sean Hannity was a client of President Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, The Atlantic reports that the political commentator has employed at least two other lawyers with links to the president and who are also frequent guests on his show.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's not about the numbering.

You'll be hearing a lot this week about the publishing milestone DC Comics' Action Comics has achieved, with the publication of issue #1000, on shelves (physical and digital) today. And I don't mean to dismiss that achievement, believe me. It's 2018, and periodical publishing is a lot like the Man of Steel in the penultimate panel of 1992's "Death of Superman" storyline: Beaten to a bloody pulp and hovering at death's door.

Two-thirds of the way through Alexander Chee's How to Write an Autobiographical Novel, I abandoned my sharpened reviewer's pencil in favor of luxuriating in the words. Chee's writing has a mesmerizing quality; his sentences are rife with profound truths without lapsing into the didactic.

One of my greatest lessons in the power of representation on TV came from watching an episode of Scandal.

In fall 2013, I spent an evening with a group of black and brown women watching an installment from the show's third season. We were gathered in a comfortable, tastefully decorated town house in Washington, D.C. Spirits were high — everyone was ready to watch political fixer supreme Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) tackle the latest bizarro crisis invented by series creator Shonda Rhimes.

It's been almost a year since since James Comey first learned that President Trump had fired him. The former FBI director was in Los Angeles visiting the field office for a diversity event when a ticker announcing his ouster scrolled across the bottom of a TV screen.

"I thought it was a scam," Comey says. "I went back to talking to the people who were gathered in front of me."

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Trump suggested yesterday that preparations for his in-person meeting with North Korean dictator are going well. Here he is addressing reporters at his Florida resort.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

One of my greatest lessons in the power of representation on TV came from watching an episode of Scandal.

In fall 2013, I spent an evening with a group of black and brown women watching an installment from the show's third season. We were gathered in a comfortable, tastefully decorated town house in Washington, D.C. Spirits were high — everyone was ready to watch political fixer supreme Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) tackle the latest bizarro crisis invented by series creator Shonda Rhimes.

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already she's helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. She's doing it with the help of her mom, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth.

Duckworth gave birth to Maile, her second child, on April 9, and she wants to keep her newborn nearby when she's doing her job as a senator. That would require a change in Senate rules that typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber during votes.

Pledging to impeach President Trump would backfire on Democrats hoping to take back the House of Representatives this fall, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll.

Editor's note: Since this story was first posted, we have received word that Destini Johnson is regaining consciousness and is out of intensive care.

Last August, Destini Johnson practically danced out of jail, after landing there for two months on drug charges. She bubbled with excitement about her new freedom and returning home to her parents in Muncie, Ind. She even talked about plans to find a job.

Ronan Farrow just won the Pulitzer Prize for stories he wrote for The New Yorker, but before uncovering sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein for the magazine, he worked at the State Department as a special adviser in the Obama administration.

Australian authorities have shut down a major international surfing event after recreational surfers were attacked by sharks near the site of the competition on the country's southwest coast.

The World Surf League cancelled the remainder of this year's Margaret River Pro, which began April 11 and was to finish on Monday. The decision came after the two surfers, who were not in the competition, were mauled in separate attacks earlier this week at surf spots only a few miles from the event's main venue in West Australia.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

CIA Director Mike Pompeo made a secret visit to North Korea earlier this month and met with leader Kim Jong Un — a meeting that "went very smoothly," President Trump said on Wednesday.

"A good relationship was formed," Trump said, adding that the direct contact with North Korea — a rare step for the U.S. — was intended to work out details of a possible Trump-Kim summit.

Updated at 10:53 p.m. ET

The legal fight against the citizenship question planned for the 2020 census is mounting with more lawsuits, including one filed Tuesday in San Francisco federal court on behalf of the city of San Jose, Calif., and Black Alliance for Just Immigration, a California-based immigrant rights group led by Black Lives Matter co-founder Opal Tometi.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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