KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Lick It Up

Lick It Up is a Mexican Street Food Truck created by two cooks who also happen to be musicians—hence the name that References their favorite rock band KISS. They can be found in the patio of Monarch bar and café which is located near the corner of Rio Grande and Mesa. These guys are having fun with food and create a rotating menu that includes items such as vegan bollio filled with setian milanesa, gorditas and vegan pastor tacos. Today my guests are the owners of Lick It Up, Javi Gardea and Edgar Delphin.

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If you were an incoming freshman and saw a sign that said "Spit for Science," what would you think? This week we visit with Dr. Danielle Dick, Virginia Commonwealth University, as she shares details about her research. She focuses on how genetic and environmental influences contribute to the development of patterns of substance use and related behaviors, such as childhood conduct problems and depression, and how we can use that information to inform prevention and intervention.

Quintan Ana Wikswo joins us again to talk about her interesting hybrid book that Publishers Weekly calls, "euphoric and surprising." Always an interesting and insightful conversation whenever Quintan Ana joins us, and we'll learn more about her book "A Long Curving Scare Where The Heart Should Be."

As we approach the anniversary of the JFK assassination, conspiracy theories continue to surface. We spoke with Judyth Vary Baker, Lee Harvey Oswald's girlfriend. Baker is the author of several books including "Me & Lee" and "Kennedy and Oswald: The Big Picture." She talks about her books as well as some of the recent files released on the assassination.

The annual Las Artistas Art and Fine Crafts Show takes place on November 18 and 19, 2017 at the Epic Railyard Event Center on 2201 East Mills Avenue. 

Las Artistas is the perfect way to kick off to the holiday shopping season, it gives you the opportunity to learn the story behind the art by talking directly to the artists and art students to learn about their techniques and inspiration. Here with us today are John Ruhmann, Jorge Calleja, and Dina Edens.

El Paso Pro-Musica is once again collaborating with Johns Hopkins University and the Peabody School of Music to present the Young Artist Development Series. This is a series that showcases young amazing talent in the Graduate and Doctoral program from the esteemed University.

This year's recipient is Guitarist Nathan Cornelius who is presenting "A World of Guitar." He is a former National Geographic Bee winner, and incorporates Geography with his Music. 

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