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STATE OF THE ARTS: Author Isabel Quintero & Illustrator Zeke Pena

Author Isabel Quintero and illustrator Zeke Peña have come together to collaborate on the book Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide, from Getty Publications. The book is “an evocative and poetic graphic biography about renowned Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide and her adventures around the world.”

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Latest from KTEP

-ORIGINALLY AIRED DECEMBER 31, 2016-

Carlos Rosales, former journalist and ABC-7 Assistant News Director, recaps 2016 with some of El Paso's top stories in journalism.

The El Paso Choral Society presents one of the most popular musical works of our time: Carmina Burana by Carl Orff on Saturday, April 28, 2018, at 7:30pm at the Abraham Chavez Theatre.

This passionate and thrilling music will be performed by the 100-voice El Paso Chorale and it’s orchestra including the professional orchestra of Juarez along with several soloists.  Prentice Loftin previews the program.

Ladies, Wine and Design is a salon night held monthly for creative and professional ladies. They wine, dine, and have casual conversations on a wide variety of topics relating to creativity, business, and life. These monthly gatherings are open to female creatives and professionals in any field.

This month’s event is called “Curating our Border” featuring an exchange of experiences working with the border community focusing on leadership, empowerment and how the border is portrayed. The event will be held at Montecillo at Nuhda on Friday April 27 and it begins at 6pm.

Meet some native El Pasoans... we're talking plants, not people! This week we discussed recommendations, uses, and management of your native plants in your backyard gardens. 

The releases of Avengers: Infinity War next week marks the official kick-off of the 2018 summer movie season. Movies 4 Kids is a new local nonprofit that's dedicated to providing advanced screenings of these films to El Paso's underprivileged and less fortunate children. This week, we visited with the group's founders, Rene Herrera and Luis Anzures, to discuss how their organization came about and next week's special event. 

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Updated at 4:15 p.m.

Nashville Police are warning residents to keep their doors locked and their eyes open for a partially nude man following a shooting early Sunday morning that left four people dead.

There is reason to believe, police say, that the suspect at large is carrying two guns that were not found during a search of the gunman's home.

Amnesty International has given Colin Kaepernick its top human rights award for his public opposition to racial injustice. The former San Franciso 49ers quarterback is Amnesty's 2018 Ambassador of Conscience

Teri Schultz reports for our Newscast unit that the "take a knee" campaign that won Kaepernick honor likely cost him his job:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warning to consumers Friday to stay away from all types of romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region because of an E. coli outbreak that has infected at least 61 people in 16 states.

The agency had previously instructed people not to eat chopped and bagged romaine lettuce from the area. But the new warning includes whole heads of romaine in addition to all of the packaged products.

After weeks of living as a fugitive — and reportedly trying to steal the identity of a look-alike — Lois Riess has been arrested. Riess, 56, is wanted in connection with killings in two states, as well as stolen and forged checks.

"We look at her appearance. She looks like anybody's mother or grandmother," Undersheriff Carmine Marceno of Lee County, Fla., said Friday. "Yet she's an absolute cold-blooded murderer."

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NPR Politics

Liuba Grechen Shirley has a son who's almost two and a daughter who's almost four. And until recently, the stay-at-home mom and freelance consultant had her childcare routine down.

"The bulk of the child care during the day was up to me," she said. And when she had work to do, she'd get help with watching the kids — but it was free.

"My mother is a teacher. She comes home at 3:30 every afternoon, and she would watch my children from 3:30 on, and that's when I'd start consulting," Grechen Shirley said.

Many political campaign workers spend long hours at low pay, living off of pizza and coffee, all in the hope of seeing their candidate win.

Now, labor organizers are setting their sights on bringing those workers into the labor movement at a time when the percentage of U.S. workers who belong to a union is falling steadily.

The newly formed Campaign Workers Guild claims to have helped organize at least a dozen Democratic campaigns and one political consulting firm.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

We turn now to Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk. Ron, thanks so much for being with us.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Scott.


Emily Nakano began doing lockdown drills when she was in second grade.

"An alarm plays over the PA system, and we lock the door, turn off the lights and hide in a corner away from the window," she explained.

The high school senior from Illinois said she's grown up with a fear of school shootings in the back of her mind, even though she's not scared of guns. In fact, she's been around guns her entire life.

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NPR Business News

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Billboards are having a moment.

Traditional advertising has been falling for years. Companies just aren't spending as much on newspaper, radio and television ads. And last year was not much better, according to an industry report.

But there is one traditional advertising form that is showing signs of life: billboards and other parts of the segment known as out-of-home advertising.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Maine Public. To see more, visit Maine Public.

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NPR Arts News

Zoologist Lucy Cooke says humans have got it all wrong about sloths. "People think that because the animal is slow that it's somehow useless and redundant," she says. But in fact, "they are incredibly successful creatures."

Cooke is the founder of the Sloth Appreciation Society and the author of a new book called The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife. The book aims to set the record straight on some long-held misconceptions about the animal world.

When The Exorcist, based on the novel by William Blatty, came to theaters in 1973, it captured the public imagination. Or more accurately, the public's nightmares.

Exorcisms aren't just the stuff of horror movies — hundreds of thousands of Italian Catholics reportedly request them each year. But when William Friedkin directed the movie, he'd never actually seen an exorcism. It would be four more decades before he actually witnessed one.

I love that the entire plot of John Scalzi's newest novel, Head On, hinges on a cat.

I mean, it's such a stupid idea. It's a gimmick that's been played straight, played crooked, played backwards and forwards in so many stories that there's just no trope-life left in it. Cat as McGuffin. Cat as material witness. Cat as embodiment of damsels in distress. It's the literary equivalent of Scooby Doo and the gang pulling the rubber mask off old Mr. McGillicutty the groundskeeper because he was the pirate ghost all along.

Edie Falco starred in the groundbreaking HBO show, Oz, and then gained fame and a boatload of awards playing Carmela on HBO's The Sopranos. She followed that up by creating another iconic character, Nurse Jackie, on Showtime. Her new movie is a drama called Outside In.

Since Falco starred in The Sopranos, we've invited her to play a game called "Woke up this morning and got myself an aria" — three questions about tenors.

Click the listen link above to see how she does.

In January, Ursula K. Le Guin died. Her Washington Post obituary is glowing; it notes that The Left Hand of Darkness "was cited by literary critic Harold Bloom in The Western Canon, his overview of classic literature, and paved the way for Ms. Le Guin's broader acceptance." It also, reverentially, identifies her as the "grande dame" of science fiction.

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Meet some native El Pasoans... we're talking plants, not people! This week we discussed recommendations, uses, and management of your native plants in your backyard gardens. 

The releases of Avengers: Infinity War next week marks the official kick-off of the 2018 summer movie season. Movies 4 Kids is a new local nonprofit that's dedicated to providing advanced screenings of these films to El Paso's underprivileged and less fortunate children. This week, we visited with the group's founders, Rene Herrera and Luis Anzures, to discuss how their organization came about and next week's special event. 

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

James Comey To 'Fresh Air': The FBI Isn't 'On Anybody's Side': The former FBI director tells Terry Gross that he wants to sound the alarm about the "forest fire" of the Trump presidency — and also to defend the FBI against charges of partisanship.

Actress Allison Mack was arrested on Friday morning and charged with recruiting women into an empowerment group that functioned as a sex trafficking operation.

Mack, 35, "recruited women to join what was purported to be a female mentorship group," said Richard P. Donoghue, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, in a written statement. "Victims were then exploited, both sexually and for their labor, to the defendants' benefit."

Edie Falco starred in the groundbreaking HBO show, Oz, and then gained fame and a boatload of awards playing Carmela on HBO's The Sopranos. She followed that up by creating another iconic character, Nurse Jackie, on Showtime. Her new movie is a drama called Outside In.

Since Falco starred in The Sopranos, we've invited her to play a game called "Woke up this morning and got myself an aria" — three questions about tenors.

Click the listen link above to see how she does.

Prediction

Apr 21, 2018

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next big food item? - Mo Rocca.

MO ROCCA: Now on the menu at Marin County's finest eateries, decomposed organic waste ordinarily used as fertilizer mixed in with fruit and sugar syrup for the delectable dessert known as compost compote.

(LAUGHTER)

Remembering Carl Kasell

Apr 21, 2018

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

So this is how WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME began - the very first moments of our very first episode, January 1998.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

CARL KASELL: From outside the newsroom - from way outside the newsroom, it's WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Apr 21, 2018

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Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer is now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

Billboards are having a moment.

Traditional advertising has been falling for years. Companies just aren't spending as much on newspaper, radio and television ads. And last year was not much better, according to an industry report.

But there is one traditional advertising form that is showing signs of life: billboards and other parts of the segment known as out-of-home advertising.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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