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STATE OF THE ARTS: Vedem: The Underground Magazine of the Terezin Ghetto

"Vedem: The Underground Magazine of the Terezin Ghetto" is a multi-media traveling exhibit that deconstructs and reinterprets the literary work of a secret society of Jewish boys, who created the longest-running underground magazine in a Nazi camp. Vedem was their voice, their defiance, and their connection to life before. Using pop-art graphics, drawings and paintings, and the prose and poetry of teenage prisoners in Terezin, the exhibit breaks down the original pages of Vedem then reconstructs them in the form of a contemporary magazine.

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The periodic table of elements is like a typewriter for chemists. Like a writer who sits behind a typewriter and uses the keys to create a chemist looks at the periodic table of elements and looks for ways to create. For Professor Gregory Robinson, his creativity comes in the form of creating new molecules.

Vikram Paralkar is a hematologist and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania and it was his medical knowledge along with his fond memories of the bookstores and libraries that he would frequent as a child in Mumbai that inspired his first novel, "The Afflictions".  In his novel, a librarian discovers a medical encyclopedia that describes and details a variety of pseudo diseases.

Aired March 26, 2017 

Cirque du Soleil returns to El Paso with multiple performances of Ovo from April 12 through April 16, 2017 at the Don Haskins Center.  

Ovo, meaning “egg” in Portuguese, is a headlong rush into a colorful ecosystem teeming with life, where insects work, eat, crawl, flutter, play, fight and look for love in a non-stop riot of energy and movement. 

"Vedem: The Underground Magazine of the Terezin Ghetto" is a multi-media traveling exhibit that deconstructs and reinterprets the literary work of a secret society of Jewish boys, who created the longest-running underground magazine in a Nazi camp.

Vedem was their voice, their defiance, and their connection to life before. Using pop-art graphics, drawings and paintings, and the prose and poetry of teenage prisoners in Terezin, the exhibit breaks down the original pages of Vedem then reconstructs them in the form of a contemporary magazine. 

Have you ever wanted to start a school garden? Well you're in luck! Host Denise Rodriguez and garden curator John White talk all about school gardens. Providing tips, pointers and advice, Denise and John give you all the information and encouragement you need to start your own school garden.   

Aired March 25, 2017

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Canyon Mansfield and his dog were walking the ridge line near his house in Pocatello, Idaho, when the 14-year-old spotted a curious device that looked like a sprinkler nestled in the ground.

A federal judge levied two punishments over the "Bridgegate" tale of political retaliation in New Jersey Wednesday, sentencing former Port Authority Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni to two years in prison and Bridget Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, to 18 months.

The sentencing comes months after Baroni and Kelly were found guilty of crimes that included conspiracy and fraud.

Two anti-abortion rights activists who covertly recorded themselves discussing fetal tissue with Planned Parenthood staff are facing felony charges in California, for allegedly violating state law by filming people without their permission.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt on Tuesday, saying the state "will not tolerate the criminal recording of confidential conversations."

When it broadcasts the Winter Olympics from South Korea next year, NBC will do so with live programming across the U.S., bringing an end to the network's decades-old strategy of delaying coverage according to U.S. time zones.

Updated 6:45 p.m. ET

In Washington, D.C., U.S. Capitol Police have identified a suspect in Wednesday's incident in which a driver "nearly struck" police officers and shots were fired.

Capitol Police communications director Eva Malecki identifies the suspect as Taleah Everett, 20, who appears to have no fixed address.

Malecki says the officers observed an "erratic and aggressive" driver near the Capitol on Independence Avenue at 9:22 a.m. ET and tried to carry out a traffic stop.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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This episode first ran in 2015.

Get Out is a comic film. Get Out is a horror movie. Get Out is serious commentary. It's hard to say what exactly Get Out is, but it is definitely a blockbuster. Which is surprising, because it was made by a company which totally rejects the blockbuster model: Blumhouse Productions.

The most expensive part of doing business in outer space is getting there. The private space flight company SpaceX thinks it can change all that, and it's about to face a big test of its technology.

Scott Pruitt, the new leader of the Environmental Protection Agency, is facing a quandary.

A federal court has ordered him to decide by midnight on Friday whether to ban a pesticide called chlorpyrifos. The Obama administration proposed this ban back in 2015.

The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., has generated plenty of controversy since it opened last fall.

But concerns about President Trump's conflicts of interest might not be enough to stop his company from opening a second hotel in the nation's capital.

Where Have All The Bob Seger Albums Gone?

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There was no such thing as Classic Rock in 1976 — the phrase, and the radio format it inspired, wouldn't come into common usage until the mid-1980s. But there was already some notion of a rock and roll canon, a list of key albums that FM listeners needed to have in their collection. At the start of 1976, Bob Seger had zero albums on that list. Twelve months later, he had two: Live Bullet, the double LP documenting some blistering hometown sets at Detroit's Cobo Hall, and Night Moves, his first platinum album, whose title single would peak at No. 4 as 1977 began.

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I was in the mood for reading "lite" this week. It was a nice fleeting thought. Instead, I took a detour because I got curious about Daniel Magariel's slim debut novel, One of the Boys, which is adorned with raves from writers who mostly don't generate such blurbs.

I found myself reading the novel in one still afternoon. A slim, deeply affecting and brutal story, One of the Boys is about the fierce power of a father-son relationship, which, in these pages, all but grinds a young boy to a pulp.

Jim Harrison lived as he wrote, vividly. When his overtaxed heart finally gave out last year, he left a trail of 40 books, mainly fiction and poetry, in which he conveyed his untamed passions for booze, botany, sex, hunting, fishing and literature. His deep empathy for America's disenfranchised was matched by his overarching intolerance of small-minded "nit-wit authorities." He has been compared to Hemingway and Faulkner, and called the American Rabelais, a Mozart of the Prairie, and a force of nature.

I have always found it difficult to explain my family's syncretic faith traditions to both white Americans and to other South Asians. We are Hindu Sindhis, originating from an area around the Indus River, in what is now modern southeast Pakistan. On our home altar, familiar Hindu idols — Lakshmi, Ganesh, Krishna — share space with images of the 10 Sikh gurus and Jhulelal. Jhulelal, a river deity, is not only the patron saint of Hindu Sindhis, but is also revered by Sufi Muslims.

Quick quiz: What do Judy Garland's rendition of "Over the Rainbow," N.W.A's seminal Straight Outta Compton and the inaugural episode of NPR's All Things Considered have in common?

That little riddle just got a little easier to answer on Wednesday: The Library of Congress announced that all three "aural treasures" — along with roughly two dozen other recordings — have been inducted into its National Recording Registry.

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The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., has generated plenty of controversy since it opened last fall.

But concerns about President Trump's conflicts of interest might not be enough to stop his company from opening a second hotel in the nation's capital.

Muslim children are more likely to be bullied in school than children of other faiths. A new survey by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) reveals that 42 percent of Muslims with children in K–12 schools report bullying of their children because of their faith, compared with 23 percent of Jewish and 20 percent of Protestant parents.

These results confirm recent findings by other research and advocacy groups showing that bullying of students of color is on the rise.

Canyon Mansfield and his dog were walking the ridge line near his house in Pocatello, Idaho, when the 14-year-old spotted a curious device that looked like a sprinkler nestled in the ground.

A federal judge levied two punishments over the "Bridgegate" tale of political retaliation in New Jersey Wednesday, sentencing former Port Authority Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni to two years in prison and Bridget Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, to 18 months.

The sentencing comes months after Baroni and Kelly were found guilty of crimes that included conspiracy and fraud.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

I was in the mood for reading "lite" this week. It was a nice fleeting thought. Instead, I took a detour because I got curious about Daniel Magariel's slim debut novel, One of the Boys, which is adorned with raves from writers who mostly don't generate such blurbs.

I found myself reading the novel in one still afternoon. A slim, deeply affecting and brutal story, One of the Boys is about the fierce power of a father-son relationship, which, in these pages, all but grinds a young boy to a pulp.

Two anti-abortion rights activists who covertly recorded themselves discussing fetal tissue with Planned Parenthood staff are facing felony charges in California, for allegedly violating state law by filming people without their permission.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt on Tuesday, saying the state "will not tolerate the criminal recording of confidential conversations."

The Texas Panhandle is windy and flat and full of sky, material ripe for country songs and buried Cadillacs.

Lawmakers from both parties are increasingly convinced that the United States Senate is on a collision course that will permanently change the dynamics of the chamber — and the United States Supreme Court.

There's a growing bipartisan sadness and resignation about next week's showdown over the rules that govern high court nominations. But that doesn't mean there's any serious attempt from either party to avoid it.

Where Have All The Bob Seger Albums Gone?

6 hours ago

There was no such thing as Classic Rock in 1976 — the phrase, and the radio format it inspired, wouldn't come into common usage until the mid-1980s. But there was already some notion of a rock and roll canon, a list of key albums that FM listeners needed to have in their collection. At the start of 1976, Bob Seger had zero albums on that list. Twelve months later, he had two: Live Bullet, the double LP documenting some blistering hometown sets at Detroit's Cobo Hall, and Night Moves, his first platinum album, whose title single would peak at No. 4 as 1977 began.

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