KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Tino Ortega

Tino Ortega is an El Paso artists that combines elements of street and fine art to create colorful works of art. It could be said that the self taught artist creates a series of smaller paintings to make up a large image.

Read More

Latest from KTEP

University of Vermont

Julia Perdrial is an assistant professor of geochemistry at the University of Vermont. As an environmental bio-geochemist and mineralogist, she takes a strong interdisciplinary approach to study low temperature environmental terrestrial and aquatic processes by combining experimental and field approaches. The aim of her research is to understand how the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere interact to shape the Earth’s terrestrial surface, now often termed the Critical Zone. This Critical Zone can be thought of as the skin of the earth: the terrestrial surface spans from the top of the canopy down to the bedrock - including groundwater - and provides us with water, nutrients and many other ecosystem services.

J.L. Powers is the award-winning author of three young adult novels, The Confessional, This Thing Called the Future, and Amina. She works as an editor/publicist for Cinco Puntos Press, and teaches creative writing, literature, and composition at Skyline College in California’s Bay Area. M.A. Powers has a PhD in the oncological sciences from the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is currently a stay-at-home dad and lives in Maine. Broken Circle is his first novel written and the first novel the siblings have written together. 

Artist Humberto Hernandez known as DECK has tirelessly been working on a unique and distinct style for years.  For his first solo exhibition at Dream Chasers Club, titled DEConstruction, he chose to focus on abstract pieces.

DECstruction is a project created to show the correlation between color, shapes and lines. 

Artist Diego Martinez, best known for his “Robot” paintings, was born and raised on the El Paso/Juarez border.  His work features bright colors and is based on random thoughts and emotions that he’s feeling, or metaphors depicting a personal experience or tribulation he’s gone through.

Don't get caught up in the weeds! Take action now to control your winter weeds and your garden will thank you come the spring. Proper identification and timing are the keys to effective weed control, and Good to Grow hosts are here to help.

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

Atlanta Police are seeking an Uber Eats driver who they say killed a customer during a delivery.

The department confirmed to NPR that officers responded to a call of a person shot in the Buckhead neighborhood in north Atlanta on Saturday around 11:30 p.m. Investigators learned from witnesses that the victim left his apartment to meet an Uber Eats driver, took his order and began walking away from the delivery vehicle.

Apocryphal stories about our nation's first president abound.

Wooden dentures? Experts say disabusing the public of this myth is like ... well, pulling teeth. (And George Washington did have several pulled, having suffered mightily from dental problems.)

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

The FBI says that someone called its tip line to report concerns about Nikolas Cruz, who has told police he killed 17 people in a Florida high school this week — but that the bureau failed to follow protocols to assess the threat.

The bureau says a person close to Cruz contacted the FBI's Public Access Line on Jan. 5 to report concerns about him. Those concerns included information about Cruz's gun ownership, a desire to kill people, erratic behavior and disturbing social media posts.

As the news broke of a school shooting in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday, hundreds of Twitter accounts believed to be under Russian sway pivoted.

Many had been tweeting about places like Syria and Ukraine — countries where Russia is seeking to strengthen its influence. Suddenly the accounts shifted to hashtags like #guncontrol, #guncontrolnow and #gunreformnow. Tweets mentioning Nikolas Cruz, the name of the shooting suspect, spiked.

There are signs of thawing in the tense relationship between the U.S. and Turkey, as U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson visits Turkey's capital, Ankara, and holds lengthy talks with leadership.

The central rift between the two countries is over Syria. The U.S. supports and arms Kurdish fighters in northern Syria, seeing them as key allies against ISIS. Turkey describes them as terrorists.

More News

NPR Politics

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Morning News Brief

7 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Why The AR-15?

49 minutes ago

After nearly every mass shooting, a few words are repeated over and over: Thoughts. Prayers. AR-15.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The Trump administration is proposing to dramatically cut funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a move critics say is an ongoing assault on the 7-year-old agency.

The bureau was championed by Elizabeth Warren and other Democrats and created in the wake of the financial crisis to protect Americans from getting ripped off by financial firms.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

Fifty years ago Monday, when Fred Rogers showed up on national public television as the host of what then was a brand new children's show called Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, TV was a lot different. PBS wasn't even a network then — not by that name, anyway — and aside from CBS, NBC and ABC, there were only a few independent local channels to watch, if that.

In more than three decades of work, Doug Jones has carved out a niche in the acting world by playing strange and otherworldly creatures. He was a demonic superhero in Hellboy and a monster with an appetite for children in Pan's Labyrinth.

But there was one storyline that proved elusive: Jones says, "I never saw romantic leading male [stories] coming with any creature roles."

Margery Simkin is a casting director. Her job is to look at thousands of faces, and her gut reaction — how she feels about what she sees — can lead to movie and TV roles.

But for this story, she isn't looking at a headshot — she's looking at a painting. "This wouldn't be somebody that could be a bad guy," she says. "There's a softness. There's a kindness in his eyes."

In the wake of tragedy, confusing and conflicting feelings like fear and anger can be overwhelming. In her breakout novel, Rihannon Navin takes readers on the emotional journey that explores some of these feelings.

Only Child centers around a family reconciling with the aftermath of a mass shooting at an elementary school. It's told from the perspective of 6-year-old Zach, who survived the shooting in which his brother Andy died.

The first Bible I ever purchased was a New International Version Student Life Bible; it was black with neon pink and green lettering. I picked it up from the bookstore of a church I was invited to in my late teens. This "expanded" version featured maps, reading plans, and questionnaires geared toward teenagers who wanted to learn how to effectively apply biblical principles to their daily lives. In other words, how to learn to be the "salt of the earth."

More NPR Arts News

Oxfam International says three members of a team it deployed to Haiti in 2010 who were investigated for sexual exploitation there threatened a key witness in the inquiry.

The U.K.-based aid group has come under intense scrutiny in recent weeks after The Times of London reported that some of its staff working in the Caribbean country after a devastating earthquake had hired local prostitutes. Oxfam's senior official in Haiti at the time was among those implicated.

Five women were killed Sunday when a gunman opened fire at a Russian Orthodox church in the restive Northern Caucasus region of Dagestan.

Russian news sources quoted a priest from the church in Kizlyar in western Dagestan as saying the attacker, described as a local man in his 20s, began firing on churchgoers as they were leaving following Sunday afternoon service.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. women's ice hockey team dismantled Finland in their semifinals matchup at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Monday, scoring goals early and often and claiming a spot in the gold medal game, where they will face Canada.

The U.S. team scored two goals in each of the first two periods; a pair of scores came in less than one minute in the second period.

He's emerged as a fan favorite, an athlete whose talent and personality shine through his skating — and whose sense of humor and humanity have been amplified by the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. But Adam Rippon says he's not ready to move from the Olympic Athlete's Village and join NBC.

News that the TV network had offered Rippon a job emerged on Sunday here at the Pyeongchang Games. But one day later, Rippon says he was glad to be asked — but that he still has work to do, cheering for his teammates.

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, who won a bronze medal in mixed doubles for the Olympic Athletes from Russia curling team, is under suspicion of doping, after reportedly failing a preliminary control test at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

The result hasn't been confirmed; Russian news outlets are reporting that Krushelnitckii's "A" sample had tested positive for meldonium in a preliminary test, and that his "B" sample would be tested to confirm or refute the result. That test is being carried out around midday Monday in South Korea — Sunday night in the continental U.S.

University of Vermont

Julia Perdrial is an assistant professor of geochemistry at the University of Vermont. As an environmental bio-geochemist and mineralogist, she takes a strong interdisciplinary approach to study low temperature environmental terrestrial and aquatic processes by combining experimental and field approaches. The aim of her research is to understand how the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere interact to shape the Earth’s terrestrial surface, now often termed the Critical Zone. This Critical Zone can be thought of as the skin of the earth: the terrestrial surface spans from the top of the canopy down to the bedrock - including groundwater - and provides us with water, nutrients and many other ecosystem services.

In the wake of tragedy, confusing and conflicting feelings like fear and anger can be overwhelming. In her breakout novel, Rihannon Navin takes readers on the emotional journey that explores some of these feelings.

Only Child centers around a family reconciling with the aftermath of a mass shooting at an elementary school. It's told from the perspective of 6-year-old Zach, who survived the shooting in which his brother Andy died.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sunday afternoon, Cameron Kasky is doing push-ups in a park near Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Kasky, a junior, says kids like himself are doing something new, demanding a fresh look at America's gun laws.

"The crescendo has hit its point. It's enough and it's over," he says. "I haven't got a shred of doubt that this is going to be our change."

Pages