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THE WEEKEND: YWCA's Kayla Suarez & Diana Hastings

Most of us when we hear the acronym YWCA, we immediately think fitness. But have you ever thought of high school dropouts, teen pregnancies, finances, or dental hygiene? This week we visit with YWCA's Kayla Suarez and Diana Hastings as they share details on the variety of programs the YWCA has to offer for our community.

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It's no secret that J. Edgar Hoover hated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. From 1963-1968, COINTELPRO launched an aggressive legal, but mostly illegal surveillance against the Civil Rights Movement. New York Time's best selling author Steve Berry joins us again to discuss new thriller The Bishop's Pawn.

Most of us when we hear the acronym YWCA, we immediately think fitness. But have you ever thought of high school dropouts, teen pregnancies, finances, or dental hygiene? This week we visit with YWCA's Kayla Suarez and Diana Hastings as they share details on the variety of programs the YWCA has to offer for our community.

David Lewinksi

Many people believe that heart disease is irreversible. But plant-based nutrition can improve your health and actually reduce your chance of having a major heart attack. Acclaimed cardiologist and author Dr. Joel Kahn is our guest and he enlightens us on his transition from traditional cardiology practice to a holistic cardiologist. Dr. Kahn believes that plant-based nutrition is the most powerful source of preventative medicine on the planet and believes now is the time to focus on educating the public to eat clean, sweat clean and apply cutting-edge science to their lifestyle.

University of Vermont

Julia Perdrial is an assistant professor of geochemistry at the University of Vermont. As an environmental bio-geochemist and mineralogist, she takes a strong interdisciplinary approach to study low temperature environmental terrestrial and aquatic processes by combining experimental and field approaches. The aim of her research is to understand how the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere interact to shape the Earth’s terrestrial surface, now often termed the Critical Zone. This Critical Zone can be thought of as the skin of the earth: the terrestrial surface spans from the top of the canopy down to the bedrock - including groundwater - and provides us with water, nutrients and many other ecosystem services.

J.L. Powers is the award-winning author of three young adult novels, The Confessional, This Thing Called the Future, and Amina. She works as an editor/publicist for Cinco Puntos Press, and teaches creative writing, literature, and composition at Skyline College in California’s Bay Area. M.A. Powers has a PhD in the oncological sciences from the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is currently a stay-at-home dad and lives in Maine. Broken Circle is his first novel written and the first novel the siblings have written together. 

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Journalist Laura Ingraham sought to rebuke the Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James for "talking politics" during a recent interview — something the Fox News host believes is out of bounds for an athlete.

Ingraham said she was not interested in the political advice from "someone who gets paid $100 million a year to bounce a ball."

A group of teenagers who say they are desperate for some action on gun control staged a silent "lie-in" outside the White House Monday, in the wake of the deadly Florida school shooting last week.

Atlanta Police are seeking an Uber Eats driver who they say killed a customer during a delivery.

The department confirmed to NPR that officers responded to a call of a person shot in the Buckhead neighborhood in north Atlanta on Saturday around 11:30 p.m. Investigators learned from witnesses that the victim left his apartment to meet an Uber Eats driver, took his order and began walking away from the delivery vehicle.

Animals that live in the ocean communicate with sound — humpback whales, for example. But these voices could soon be drowned out by powerful sonic booms from vessels searching for oil and gas.

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The lengthy feature article on the front page of Monday's Washington Post was a profile of Rachel Crooks, one of more than a dozen women who have accused President Trump of sexual misconduct. After going public with her story in the fall of 2016 on the eve of the election, she is now running for the state Legislature in Ohio as a Democrat.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It was Saturday afternoon, and Abigail Spanberger was in a busy hallway at the Chesterfield County Public Library in Midlothian, Va., minutes away from training a room of about 40 campaign volunteers. She seemed ready for a quick interview, but then abruptly called out to her campaign manager.

"Hey Dana, Eileen Davis is about to come through. Can you head her off at the pass so she doesn't interrupt the — "

She cut herself off and turned to me.

"That's my mother," Spanberger said, laughing.

Her mom is volunteering for her campaign?

"Evidently."

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For a company that's all about the future of communication, Facebook is looking to the past to solve at least some of its problems.

After months of intense scrutiny over the role the company played in the 2016 presidential election, the social network giant announced it wants to use postcards to verify the identity of advertising buyers to prevent future foreign meddling.

The Trump administration wants to allow insurance companies to offer more policies that have limited health benefits and that can reject customers if they have pre-existing medical conditions.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says the plans, which don't meet the legal requirements for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, will allow consumers who can't afford insurance now to find cheaper plans.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In 1984, two men were thinking a lot about the Internet. One of them invented it. The other is an artist who would see its impact on society with uncanny prescience.

First is the man often called "the father of the Internet," Vint Cerf. Between the early 1970s and early '80s, he led a team of scientists supported by research from the Defense Department.

Initially, Cerf was trying to create an Internet through which scientists and academics from all over the world could share data and research.

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Growing up in rural Idaho, Tara Westover had no birth certificate, never saw a doctor and didn't go to school. Her parents were religious fundamentalists who stockpiled food, mistrusted the government and believed in strict gender roles for their seven children.

As a girl, Westover says, "There wasn't ever any question about what my future would look like: I would get married when I was 17 or 18, and I would be given some corner of the farm and my husband would put a house on it and we would have kids."

'Decarcerating America' Is A Powerful Call For Reform

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Criminalization is frequently America's answer to social issues.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Fifty years ago Monday, when Fred Rogers showed up on national public television as the host of what then was a brand new children's show called Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, TV was a lot different. PBS wasn't even a network then — not by that name, anyway — and aside from CBS, NBC and ABC, there were only a few independent local channels to watch, if that.

In more than three decades of work, Doug Jones has carved out a niche in the acting world by playing strange and otherworldly creatures. He was a demonic superhero in Hellboy and a monster with an appetite for children in Pan's Labyrinth.

But there was one storyline that proved elusive: Jones says, "I never saw romantic leading male [stories] coming with any creature roles."

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David Lewinksi

Many people believe that heart disease is irreversible. But plant-based nutrition can improve your health and actually reduce your chance of having a major heart attack. Acclaimed cardiologist and author Dr. Joel Kahn is our guest and he enlightens us on his transition from traditional cardiology practice to a holistic cardiologist. Dr. Kahn believes that plant-based nutrition is the most powerful source of preventative medicine on the planet and believes now is the time to focus on educating the public to eat clean, sweat clean and apply cutting-edge science to their lifestyle.

River Whyless is a band whose members push themselves toward perfection while holding each other up and allowing for some risk-taking. This is a band not only of strong players and singers but something a lot of bands rarely have: multiple, talented songwriters.

A grocery store's baby formula aisle often stocks an overwhelming number of options. Aside from different brands of pastel-hued tins and tubs, there are specialized formulas — some for spit-up reduction, gas or colic. And in the past decade or so, companies have introduced formulas meant for toddlers who are leaving bottles behind.

Updated at 8:58 a.m. ET

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has offered an overture to his U.S. counterpart on Twitter, using President Trump's preferred medium Monday to ask for talks between the two countries.

Trump "campaigned promoting non-interference in other countries' domestic affairs," Maduro tweeted, tagging the U.S. president's account. "The time has come to fulfill it and change your agenda of aggression for one of dialogue.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NCPR. To see more, visit NCPR.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitckii, who won a bronze medal at the Pyeongchang Olympics, has tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug at the Winter Games, a spokesman for the Olympic Athletes from Russia team says. The team says it will investigate to learn how the banned drug came to be in the curler's system.

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