KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Werc

Werc is an artist who was born in Ciudad Juarez, and grew up in El Paso, TX. He began his career here on the border. His love for the U.S./Mexico border can be seen in his mural “El Paso Port-All”, a 90x10 foot acrylic and mosaic piece exhibited at the entry of the Stanton Street International Bridge. His murals can be seen around southern California, and throughout the United States and Mexico.

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The It’s Your World group invites artists of all school and age levels to submit entries for their upcoming It’s Your World Art Contest. All entries must have some component of recycled materials used in it. Winning artwork will be displayed at the El Paso Museum of Art.

Photos of entries are due by March 2, 2018, and here to tell us all about It’s Your World are Candace Printz, Angela Alvarez, and Jocellynn Ceballos. 

Rebuilding Trost is a networking and silent auction event that will happen on Friday, January 26th at Power at the Pass located at 1931 Myrtle. The event will feature a presentation by Lane Gaddy, one of El Paso's leading developers and owner of three major historic buildings in the heart of our city.

The event will also feature an auction of four original pieces of art created by Diego Robot and Tino Ortega created exclusively for the Texas Trost Society. Here to tell us all about Rebuilding Trost are artists Tino Ortega and Diego Martinez and Texas Trost Society President Malissa Grossman.

Mark and Fill Everything is currently on display at the Dream Chasers Club. The show is a collaboration between artists Briks and Cask that is about a couple of buddies—Mark the Dog, and Fill, a Snake who take spray cans and markers to everything they come across. The show is up through February 10th. Today, my guest is artist Briks.

Add a new native species to your garden. Plant a food you haven't tried before. Are these gardening resolutions? Or gardening tips? Well, we think they're both! Hosts Denise Rodriguez and John White share more ideas to help spruce up your garden for 2018.

Movies, for better or worse, help shape the way we see the world and an upcoming presentation will explore the ways in which filmmakers have shaped our perceptions of Mexican migrants. Samuel Rodriguez is our guest and he discusses his presentation Migration Through the Eyes of Musicians and FilmmakersThe presentation will be held at the UTEP Centennial Museum on January 25, 2018, and is free and open to the public. 

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A new study suggests that the polar jet stream has been fluctuating more than normal as it passes over the parts of the Northern Hemisphere, and that's affecting weather in Europe and North America.

Edgar Ray Killen, the former Ku Klux Klansman responsible for a notorious civil rights era murder, has died in a Mississippi prison. Killen orchestrated the killings of three Freedom Summer workers in Neshoba County, Miss. in 1964, a crime that shocked the nation and acted as a catalyst for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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In the world of streaming workout videos, Shawn T is like Jay-Z or Mick Jagger. He's a superstar. Millions of people have done his workout programs. One is called "Insanity." Another, "Focus T25," aims to get you in shape in just 25 minutes a day without leaving your house.

In our ever more digital world there are all kinds of apps and other quick ways to fit fitness into your life. But you still have to do the exercise. And in his new book, T is for Transformation, Shaun T tells the story of his life and the lessons he's learned about finding that motivation.

General Motors says it is ready to mass-produce a self-driving car that has no steering wheel, pedals or any other manual controls.

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Kentucky got the green light from the federal government Friday to require people who get Medicaid to work. It's a big change from the Obama administration, which rejected overtures from states that wanted to add a work requirement.

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Leni Zumas' new novel, Red Clocks, imagines a time in which something called the Personhood Amendment has made abortion and in vitro fertilization a crime in the United States; Canada returns women who slip across the border to seek those services. The novel is set in an Oregon town near that border — and it invites inevitable comparison to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

Is it also a parable for our time? Zumas says the story started out with "some personal anxiety and anguish of my own," but grew into something larger.

Like most people, Rian Johnson was a huge Star Wars fan as a kid. Unlike most people, he grew up to make a Star Wars movie — he wrote and directed The Last Jedi.

The man behind the latest Star Wars feature film plays a game called Storage Wars -- about the reality show where people guess what's in repossessed storage lockers before they're auctioned off.

Click the listen link above to see how he does.

Christopher J. Yates begins his new novel, Grist Mill Road, with a crime in progress:

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It is summer, 1982, and in a clearing in the woods outside the small town of Roseborn, N.Y., a 14-year-old boy shoots a 13-year-old girl over and over and over again with a BB gun while, close by, a 12-year-old boy stands and watches.

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There's a fine line between satire and the nasty snigger that marks so much of pop comedy these days — which is another way of saying that the corrosively funny takedown of child beauty pageants in the 2006 movie Little Miss Sunshine moved me to forgive (by a hair) its creepiest creation — Alan Arkin's heroin-addicted grandpa. Still, I wonder whether my 14-year-old, who has roared her way through that movie at least a dozen times, can tell the difference between sharp commentary and the juvie desire to shock.

The obvious way to approach South Korean director Seung-jun Yi's modest but potent documentary Planet of Snail is to think of it as a story about a disabled man making his way through the world with the help of his companion. But more simply and more accurately, it's really a movie about marriage — about the way two people can smooth over each other's cracks to achieve an imperfect yet sturdy wholeness.

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Editor's note: This is another one of those stories that came to me fortuitously by email. Bruce Berman teaches photography in Las Cruces, N.M., and, like many photography instructors, he has a huge archive of his own. This is just a small selection of his color photographs documenting life in the border town of El Paso, Texas.

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When William Bolcom's opera A View from the Bridge premiered in Chicago in 1999, one critic described it as "Brooklyn verismo," invoking the emotive style popularized by Italian composers such as Puccini. And that pretty much hits the nail on the head.

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