KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Werc

Werc is an artist who was born in Ciudad Juarez, and grew up in El Paso, TX. He began his career here on the border. His love for the U.S./Mexico border can be seen in his mural “El Paso Port-All”, a 90x10 foot acrylic and mosaic piece exhibited at the entry of the Stanton Street International Bridge. His murals can be seen around southern California, and throughout the United States and Mexico.

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Add a new native species to your garden. Plant a food you haven't tried before. Are these gardening resolutions? Or gardening tips? Well, we think they're both! Hosts Denise Rodriguez and John White share more ideas to help spruce up your garden for 2018.

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Host Keith Pannell is on the road and visits with Dr. Duane Gill, Professor and Head of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. His areas of specialization include disasters and contaminated communities. Dr. Gill has conducted research understand social and psychological impacts of the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Alaska and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in coastal Alabama. Dr. Gill was part of a research team employed by the Gitga’at First Nation in British Columbia to assess potential impacts of an oil spill associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project. He discusses his recent studies on natural disasters and the impacts communities can face in terms of social impact.

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Jeffrey Engel is an award-winning American history scholar and the founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. He joins us this week to discuss his latest work, When the World Seemed New: George H. W. Bush and the End of the Cold War.

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A new study suggests that the polar jet stream has been fluctuating more than normal as it passes over the parts of the Northern Hemisphere, and that's affecting weather in Europe and North America.

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In the world of streaming workout videos, Shawn T is like Jay-Z or Mick Jagger. He's a superstar. Millions of people have done his workout programs. One is called "Insanity." Another, "Focus T25," aims to get you in shape in just 25 minutes a day without leaving your house.

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Kentucky got the green light from the federal government Friday to require people who get Medicaid to work. It's a big change from the Obama administration, which rejected overtures from states that wanted to add a work requirement.

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Leni Zumas' new novel, Red Clocks, imagines a time in which something called the Personhood Amendment has made abortion and in vitro fertilization a crime in the United States; Canada returns women who slip across the border to seek those services. The novel is set in an Oregon town near that border — and it invites inevitable comparison to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

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Some Ga. Schools Make Mandarin Mandatory

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