KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Werc

Werc is an artist who was born in Ciudad Juarez, and grew up in El Paso, TX. He began his career here on the border. His love for the U.S./Mexico border can be seen in his mural “El Paso Port-All”, a 90x10 foot acrylic and mosaic piece exhibited at the entry of the Stanton Street International Bridge. His murals can be seen around southern California, and throughout the United States and Mexico.

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Host Keith Pannell is on the road and visits with Dr. Duane Gill, Professor and Head of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. His areas of specialization include disasters and contaminated communities. Dr. Gill has conducted research understand social and psychological impacts of the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Alaska and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in coastal Alabama. Dr. Gill was part of a research team employed by the Gitga’at First Nation in British Columbia to assess potential impacts of an oil spill associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project. He discusses his recent studies on natural disasters and the impacts communities can face in terms of social impact.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED NOVEMBER 26, 2017-

Jeffrey Engel is an award-winning American history scholar and the founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. He joins us this week to discuss his latest work, When the World Seemed New: George H. W. Bush and the End of the Cold War.

Tim Hernandez has the privilege of speaking with award-winning author, editor, and co-host of Words on a Wire - Daniel Chacón! Daniel and Tim discuss Daniel's latest work, The Cholo Tree. Daniel Chacón is author of five books of fiction and editor of A Jury of Trees, the posthumous poems of Andrés Montoya. He is co-editor with Mimi Gladstein of The Last Supper of Chicano Heroes: The Selected Works of José Antonio Burciaga. He is recipient of the Pen Oakland Fiction Award, a Chris Isherwood Foundation Grant, the Hudson Book Prize, and The American Book Award.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED NOVEMBER 5, 2016-

In the 1970s, the Mexican government adopted an initiative to promote family planning among its citizens.  IUDs, intrauterine devices, were one of the options available to women.  IUDs are considered Long Acting and Reversible Contraceptives, or LARCs, and their use in Mexico far outweighed their use in the United States.  Researchers at the University of Texas investigated the use of LARCs in Austin and El Paso, and they share some surprising results with us on this program.  We'll visit with Joseph Potter, PhD, principal investigator of the Texas Policy Evaluation Project; and Kari White, PhD, investigator of the Texas Policy Evaluation Project.

Happy New Year from Good to Grow! This year, we want to push you out of your comfort zone and try something new in your garden. Hosts Denise Rodriguez and John White share some new ideas you can incorporate into your garden to kick off 2018.

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A new study suggests that the polar jet stream has been fluctuating more than normal as it passes over the parts of the Northern Hemisphere, and that's affecting weather in Europe and North America.

Edgar Ray Killen, the former Ku Klux Klansman responsible for a notorious civil rights era murder, has died in a Mississippi prison. Killen orchestrated the killings of three Freedom Summer workers in Neshoba County, Miss. in 1964, a crime that shocked the nation and acted as a catalyst for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

More than a month after the Thomas Fire took hold in California's Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, firefighters have reached 100 percent containment of the deadly blaze. The announcement Friday marks a hard-fought triumph over the wildfire, which earlier this month became the largest in modern state history.

The Thomas Fire has been blamed for two deaths and the destruction of more than 1,000 structures. Its historic toll in Southern California — more than 280,000 acres ravaged — also led to another deadly disaster: the mudslides this month in Santa Barbara County.

Simon Bramhall, the British surgeon who branded his initials onto patients' livers during transplant surgeries at least twice, has been ordered to do 120 hours of community service and pay £10,000 (more than $13,600).

Bramhall pleaded guilty in December to two counts of assault for branding his patients.

You've seen the Orion Nebula before – but not like this.

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The nation's top spy bosses scrambled to the White House early Thursday to urge President Trump to restate his support for a controversial surveillance law after he spent the morning trashing it on Twitter.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, White House chief of staff John Kelly and national security adviser H.R. McMaster all convened in the Oval Office with the president to urge him to row back his criticism. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., also joined in by telephone.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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To take a broader look at the British relationship with the U.S. under President Trump, George Parker joins us now. He is the political editor with the Financial Times. Welcome.

GEORGE PARKER: Hello.

Friday News Roundup - International

10 hours ago

Around the world, nations reportedly derided as “shithole countries” by President Trump are reacting with tough (though less vulgar) responses of their own.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

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This week, President Trump has been asking for action and compassion, telling lawmakers that he wants to see “a bipartisan bill of love” on DACA.

Then he reportedly called some nations “shithole countries” before denying the statement, but admitting to using “tough” language.

The number of House Republicans declining to run for re-election has hit a record level in 2018, as 32 GOP members have said they are leaving: 19 are retiring from public office, while 13 are seeking another position.

House Democrats are facing 15 retirements, including three seats they will have to defend in districts President Trump carried in 2018.

Just three members of the Senate have announced their retirements, all Republicans.

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In the world of streaming workout videos, Shawn T is like Jay-Z or Mick Jagger. He's a superstar. Millions of people have done his workout programs. One is called "Insanity." Another, "Focus T25," aims to get you in shape in just 25 minutes a day without leaving your house.

In our ever more digital world there are all kinds of apps and other quick ways to fit fitness into your life. But you still have to do the exercise. And in his new book, T is for Transformation, Shaun T tells the story of his life and the lessons he's learned about finding that motivation.

General Motors says it is ready to mass-produce a self-driving car that has no steering wheel, pedals or any other manual controls.

The car company said Friday that it has filed a petition with the Department of Transportation for the fourth-generation Cruise AV to hit the streets in 2019.

Kentucky got the green light from the federal government Friday to require people who get Medicaid to work. It's a big change from the Obama administration, which rejected overtures from states that wanted to add a work requirement.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Love can be hard to put into words. Poets have been trying for millennia.

For Valentine's Day, Morning Edition is offering a love poem request line. Tell us about a moment in your life regarding love or relationships, and NPR's Rachel Martin and author Kwame Alexander will find you a poem that captures that feeling.

Netflix usually presents its new shows one season at a time, with a dozen or so episodes available immediately, but its latest talk show is being unveiled at the unusual rate of one installment per month.

It's called My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman — and it's excellent. The program marks Letterman's return to the talk-show format and to series television, a journey he began in 1980 with his brief but brilliant daytime talk show, NBC's The David Letterman Show.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Mystery Guest

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Amy Webb has an interesting job that incorporates data and advice. Can you guess what it is before Ophira and Jonathan?

Heard on Luka Kain: Pikachu, Strike A Pose

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Movie Sandwiches

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If you tend to doze off in the middle of Movie Night, this game will be an extra challenge. In this final round, we took movies with three-word titles and removed the middle word. Contestants tell us what the missing word is.

Heard on Luka Kain: Pikachu, Strike A Pose

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The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

The members of Sauti Sol rehearse in a cramped recording studio above a chapati restaurant off a noisy highway in Nairobi. Bien-Aime Baraza, Delvin Mudigi and Willis Chimano — the founding members, all 25 — have been friends since they sang together as part of a gospel ensemble in high school. When they graduated in 2005, they didn't want to stop singing, so they formed Sauti Sol. Sauti is Swahili for voice, while sol is Spanish for sun. "Voices of light."

This election season, Three-Minute Fiction is getting political. Weekends on All Things Considered has a new judge, a new challenge and a new prize for Round 9. For this contest, submit original, short fiction that can be read in about three minutes, which means no more than 600 words.

The judge for this round is writer Brad Meltzer. He's the author of seven novels, including the best-seller The Inner Circle. His newest thriller, The Fifth Assassin, will be out in January.

Back in the early 1970s, a young woman at Radcliffe College faced a choice: Stay in school and get her degree, or drop out and become a legendary blues singer and guitarist. It's pretty clear Bonnie Raitt made the right choice.

Opening Panel Round

Sep 7, 2012

Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Obamabrau.

Bluff The Listener

Sep 7, 2012

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell.

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: We're playing this week with Paula Poundstone, Tom Bodett, and Jessi Klein. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill Kurtis.

(APPLAUSE)

Panel Round Two

Sep 7, 2012

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell.

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: We're playing this week with Jessi Klein, Tom Bodett, and Paula Poundstone. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

Prediction

Sep 7, 2012

Our panelists predict what this election's October Surprise will be.

Who's Bill This Time?

Sep 7, 2012

Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl, reads three quotes from the week's news: Unconventional, Bubba Returns, and What's Eating You.

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