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Chris Lee

Carnegie Hall Live Debuts on KTEP

Join KTEP on Thursday evening at 8pm for the premiere of Carnegie Hall Live. Produced by WQXR and Carnegie Hall, Carnegie Hall Live features some of the world’s best performers and ensembles in a wide range of styles, from early music to recitals to orchestral performances.

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Latest from KTEP

You wouldn't think much is going on in rural New Mexico about vegan nutrition, but you'll be surprised to hear about what one dedicated couple has accomplished. Victor and Karla Flores work for Vegan Outreach, a New Mexico based non-profit organization working to end violence towards animals and seek a future where sentient animals are no longer exploited as commodities. This week, they share with us their experiences and efforts towards their cruelty-free lifestyle.

Dr. Nadia Herrera is a UTEP alum and it was here on campus where she first began her study in structural biochemistry. Working and studying alongside her mentor Dr. Ricardo Bernal, Dr. Herrera went on and got her Ph.D. from California Institute of Technology and for this edition of Science Studio, we hear about this young lady's progress as an undergraduate researcher, to Ph.D. and up the threshold of her career.

Host Tim Hernandez features a conversation with award-winning author, editor, and co-host Daniel Chacón! They discuss a new collection book of poetry by Andres Montoya, now published posthumously decades after Montoya's passing at the young age of thirty. 

Every October the streets of Downtown El Paso become canvasses for artists to display their chalk masterpieces at the Chalk the Block. This year marks Chalk the Block’s 10 year anniversary.

To celebrate, the downtown arts festival will feature installations from near and far including Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree. The Chase music stage will be headlined by El Conjunto Nueva Ola who will bring their Cumbia clandestine sounds from el planet Lucha to El Paso. 

Mariachi Craze nonprofit organization in conjunction with Mariachi Alegre and Mariachi Tapatio will present its third annual Border Folk Festival mariachi music workshops and concert series.

The event takes place at Eastlake High School on October 12 and 13. Here to tell us all about it is Hector Rodriguez and Kevin Telles.

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"We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders" in Puerto Rico "forever," President Trump said Thursday, hinting at a possible limit on federal aid to the island territory where 3.4 million Americans have struggled to recover from two destructive hurricanes.

Here are the president's comments on the issue, compressed from three consecutive tweets:

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. Postal Service hasn't abandoned Santa Rosa, Calif., where hundreds of people are coping with total losses of their homes from an explosive wildfire. The scene in Santa Rosa has been compared with an apocalypse — but that didn't stop a mail truck from making the rounds in at least one devastated neighborhood this week.

The seven-acre "Tent City Jail" in Phoenix that helped make former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio a household name has been quietly struck once and for all after housing inmates for nearly a quarter century.

The Arizona Republic reports that prisoners from the infamous jail, made of Korean-War-era tents to alleviate overflow from more conventional facilities, were transferred late Saturday to the nearby Durango Jail.

RT, the Kremlin-backed global TV network, will remove a series of provocative street ads appearing in Washington and New York, that appear to poke fun at Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

The advertisements began appearing on bus shelters, cars and in subway stations recently. One read: "Stuck in traffic? Lost an election? Blame us!" Another teased: "Find out who we are planning to hack next."

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NPR Politics

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China: How A Superpower Sets Its Agenda

2 hours ago

It’s an event that comes around every five years, and it sets the stage for political leadership of the world’s most populous country.

The national congress of China’s Communist Party will convene on October 18, 2017 in Beijing. Chinese president Xi Jinping is likely to secure another five-year term, but there are questions about changing party policies.

White House chief of staff John Kelly made an unusual appearance at Thursday's daily press briefing to clear up a few things: He isn't going anywhere, he is not frustrated by President Trump's use of Twitter and he is not trying to micromanage the president.

"Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today," Kelly said. "I don't believe — and I just talked to the president — I don't believe that I'm being fired today. And I'm not so frustrated in this job that I'm thinking of leaving."

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Visitors to the Equifax website might have encountered something a little odd Thursday afternoon. For some consumers seeking a credit report from the agency, the page that loaded was likely to disappoint them.

On Capitol Hill Thursday, Energy Secretary Rick Perry defended a controversial proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear power plants. "There's no such thing as a free market in energy," he said in testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee. "Governments are picking winners and losers every day."

It was a remarkable statement, coming days after EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt derided such tipping of the scales as he moved to repeal the Obama-era Clean Power Plan.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Gene therapy, which has had a roller-coaster history of high hopes and devastating disappointments, took an important step forward Thursday.

A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee endorsed the first gene therapy for an inherited disorder — a rare condition that causes a progressive form of blindness that usually starts in childhood.

The recommendation came in a unanimous 16-0 vote after a daylong hearing that included emotional testimonials by doctors, parents of children blinded by the disease and from children and young adults helped by the treatment.

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Our elders didn't warn us enough about the dangers of angry, selfish men, possibly because some of them were angry, selfish men themselves. So consider the films of writer-director Noah Baumbach to be an education. Baumbach has long delighted in mocking the egomaniacs in the art world, crafting biting dark comedies around minor figures with major attitudes. He's come closer than anyone to discovering just where the breaking point lies between talent, stature, and awful behavior.

In a hospital in the late 1950s, the wheeze and ca-chunk of the respirators sound like the inside of an Industrial Age factory, only the product being churned out is another few seconds of life. Compared to the elegant organism that is the healthy human body, the inflation and collapse of the pump is a tired accordion, and the hose connecting the machine to the patient's neck is bandaged and ungainly.

In the anxious years after World War II, crusaders for decency accused many comic books of promoting deviant behavior. In the case of Wonder Woman, at least, the bluenoses were entirely correct. Some of the vintage Wonder Woman panels reproduced in Professor Marston and the Wonder Women are seriously kinky.

That was intentional and, in a way, high-minded. Briefly a professor of psychology, Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston wanted to bring his DISC theory (Dominance, Inducement, Submission, Compliance) to the pubescent masses.

Near the midpoint of director Dome Karukoski's Tom of Finland, artist Touko Laaksonen (Pekka Strang) sits on a bench, catching up with the man who was once his superior officer when they served in the Finnish army during World War II, years before.

"We've started a motorcycle club," he says. Pauses."Without the motorcycles."

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What To Do In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Sep 8, 2012

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Now to an odd potential problem here.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE WALKING DEAD")

SIMON: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging all Americans to...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Prepare for the zombie apocalypse.

Inside Security Council Talks On Syria

Sep 8, 2012

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Some Ga. Schools Make Mandarin Mandatory

Sep 8, 2012

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

Stephen Tobolowsky calls his book, The Dangerous Animals Club, a group of "pieces." They are partly essays, partly short stories, partly memoir. They are anecdotes, stories and insights that are shuffled in and out of order, like cards in a deck.

The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

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