KTEP - El Paso, Texas

WORDS ON A WIRE: Sylvia Aguilar Zéleny

Sylvia Aguilar Zéleny, novelist and short story writer, joins host Daniel Chacón in-studio for an enlightening conversation on her newest book, Todo Eso Es Yo . We also take this time as an opportunity to formally welcome Aguilar Zéleny back to the University of Texas at El Paso as she returns as a new professor in our Creative Writing Department!

Read More

Latest from KTEP

The Iveys are a group of siblings who were born and raised on the farmlands of the Rio Grande, and have been making music together since childhood. Inspired by classic rock like the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel as well as soulful legends like Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash, The Iveys music grew into an indie folk style strengthened by stellar harmonies and infused with a signature vibe of indie honesty.

The Iveys will be playing live from studio C at Star City Studios on Saturday, September 16th, 2017 and here to tell us all about their journey are brothers Arlen and Galen Ivey.

For the Love of Earth: A Recycled Art Exhibit features the works of over 30 artists of all levels from the El Paso, Las Cruces and Juarez area who use recycled material for their art. A reception takes place on Saturday September 16, 2017 from noon to 3pm at the OM Gallery at Star City. 

An initiative to create grant-based financial support for local filmmakers is making progress in the city of El Paso and will soon start giving out its first grants. Charles Horak is joined by Peter Svarzbein, El Paso City Council Representative for District 1, and Jesus Nuñez, local filmmaker and advocate, as they discuss the latest developments in the city of El Paso's process to create grant funding for film productions.
Local support for local films!

Sylvia Aguilar Zéleny, novelist and short story writer, joins host Daniel Chacón in-studio for an enlightening conversation on her newest book, Todo Eso Es Yo. We also take this time as an opportunity to formally welcome Aguilar Zéleny back to the University of Texas at El Paso as she returns as a new professor in our Creative Writing Department!

Dr. Armin Shwartzman, an associate professor at University of California San Diego, received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University and since then has used statistics for image analysis. On this week's science studio, we begin a new season with Dr. Shwartzman as he shares with us his expertise in statistics and how he has advanced his studies. 

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

Where will it go? How strong will it be? When will it hit? Those are the answers everyone wants — not the least of which are the hurricane forecasters themselves.

To get those answers, hundreds of millions of data points — everything from wind speeds to sea temperatures — pouring in from satellites, aircraft, balloons, buoys and ground stations are fed into the world's fastest computers and programmed with a variety of models at different resolutions, some looking at the big picture, others zooming in much closer.

As southern Florida prepares to take a direct hit from Hurricane Irma, officials have warned people in downtown Miami to take special care because of the 20 to 25 tower construction cranes that loom over the area, hundreds of feet tall.

Hurricane Irma is hovering somewhere between being the most- and second-most powerful hurricane recorded in the Atlantic. It follows Harvey, which dumped trillions of gallons of water on South Texas. And now, Hurricane Jose is falling into step behind Irma, and gathering strength.

Is this what climate change scientists predicted?

In a word, yes. Climate scientists such as Michael Mann at Penn State says, "The science is now fairly clear that climate change will make stronger storms stronger." Or wetter.

Long & Foster, one of the largest privately held companies in the Washington, D.C. region, was acquired Thursday by HomeServices of America. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"This is big," David Charron, chief strategy officer of Bright MLS, a multiple listing service told The Washington Post. "This is yet another data point that suggests that real estate drives the economy.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

The most powerful earthquake to hit Mexico in decades struck late Thursday off the country's southern coast and could be felt hundreds of miles away in the capital. The 8.1 magnitude temblor is blamed for killing at least 60 people.

The quake triggered fears of a tsunami, although no major damage was reported. The event came as the country already was bracing for Hurricane Katia, which made landfall Saturday night in the state of Veracruz as a Category 2 storm.

More News

NPR Politics

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The debt ceiling's days as a recurring sticking point for politicians, and a recurring worry for government employees, could be numbered, according to President Trump.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

When crisis strikes, leaders often call for sacrifice. In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and in these days before Hurricane Irma churns ashore in Florida, we've seen innumerable Americans volunteer, sacrifice and even risk their lives to help others.

It might be too easy to contrast that generous spirit with the strict practices of major air carriers. But airlines make it pretty much irresistible.

Episode 793: This Week in Time Bombs

17 hours ago

We returned from vacation this week and it felt like the world as we know it was about to end.

We're not talking about nuclear war or natural disasters. (Although there is that, too.) We're talking about the approaching economic abyss. Amid the hustle and bustle of the summer, Congress has somehow neglected to perform the basic job of passing essential legislation that keeps the U.S. economy going.

For instance, the fiscal year for the United States of America ends this month, and somebody (we're looking at you, Congress) has not yet written a new budget.

As Florida drivers hit the road to escape Hurricane Irma, the demand for gasoline has outpaced supply, leaving filling stations throughout the state short of fuel.

"It's horrible, man," said Aaron Izquierdo, who waited in a long line of cars at a Shell station in Doral on Friday. "Just yesterday I was in line for two hours to wait for gas, and by the time we got to the pump there was no gas."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A massive hack of the company Equifax has compromised the personal information of as many as 143 million Americans. Regulators have launched an investigation into what appears to be one of the most serious data breaches ever. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

While we may always be concerned with the lives of the rich and famous, the rich and famous don't always deserve that concern. Even in the hands of the legendary biographer Mary Lovell, I wondered if the denizens of The Riviera Set would sustain our interest five decades on, for the book ends in 1960 — and ostentatious wealth is now on a nasty bender.

Genevieve Valentine's latest novel is Icon.

"I have the soul of an explorer, and in nine of ten cases this leads to destruction."

-- Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, "The Hall Bedroom"

Journalist-turned-TV producer David Simon is particularly good at two things: exposing the mindless, brutal institutions and systems that grind many Americans down, and humanizing people who normally exist at the margins of polite conversation.

"You're just data and data doesn't bleed."

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

More NPR Arts News

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

What To Do In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Sep 8, 2012

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now to an odd potential problem here.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE WALKING DEAD")

SIMON: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging all Americans to...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Prepare for the zombie apocalypse.

Inside Security Council Talks On Syria

Sep 8, 2012

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Some Ga. Schools Make Mandarin Mandatory

Sep 8, 2012

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

Pages