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THE WEEKEND: YWCA's Kayla Suarez & Diana Hastings

Most of us when we hear the acronym YWCA, we immediately think fitness. But have you ever thought of high school dropouts, teen pregnancies, finances, or dental hygiene? This week we visit with YWCA's Kayla Suarez and Diana Hastings as they share details on the variety of programs the YWCA has to offer for our community.

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Larry Lesser, CETaL Director and Mathematical Sciences Department professor, joins us to discuss and play his new song “What We Carry Now”, inspired by current dialogue on gun violence and campus concealed carry.

It's no secret that J. Edgar Hoover hated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. From 1963-1968, COINTELPRO launched an aggressive legal, but mostly illegal surveillance against the Civil Rights Movement. New York Time's best selling author Steve Berry joins us again to discuss new thriller The Bishop's Pawn.

Most of us when we hear the acronym YWCA, we immediately think fitness. But have you ever thought of high school dropouts, teen pregnancies, finances, or dental hygiene? This week we visit with YWCA's Kayla Suarez and Diana Hastings as they share details on the variety of programs the YWCA has to offer for our community.

David Lewinksi

Many people believe that heart disease is irreversible. But plant-based nutrition can improve your health and actually reduce your chance of having a major heart attack. Acclaimed cardiologist and author Dr. Joel Kahn is our guest and he enlightens us on his transition from traditional cardiology practice to a holistic cardiologist. Dr. Kahn believes that plant-based nutrition is the most powerful source of preventative medicine on the planet and believes now is the time to focus on educating the public to eat clean, sweat clean and apply cutting-edge science to their lifestyle.

University of Vermont

Julia Perdrial is an assistant professor of geochemistry at the University of Vermont. As an environmental bio-geochemist and mineralogist, she takes a strong interdisciplinary approach to study low temperature environmental terrestrial and aquatic processes by combining experimental and field approaches. The aim of her research is to understand how the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere interact to shape the Earth’s terrestrial surface, now often termed the Critical Zone. This Critical Zone can be thought of as the skin of the earth: the terrestrial surface spans from the top of the canopy down to the bedrock - including groundwater - and provides us with water, nutrients and many other ecosystem services.

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Three executions were scheduled. Two were called off.

If the death sentences in Alabama, Texas and Florida had all gone ahead on Thursday night as originally planned, it would have marked the first time in eight years that three convicted killers were executed on the same day.

However, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott granted clemency to Thomas Whitaker, 38, commuting his sentence to life in prison. And late Thursday, the execution in Alabama of Doyle Lee Hamm was postponed after last minute legal wrangling pushed late into the evening.

No immediate relief is in sight for a swath of the Midwest where heavy rain, melting snow and rising rivers have shuttered schools, closed roads and prompted several evacuations.

A Mongolian horse that has long been hailed as the last truly wild horse species in existence isn't really all that wild.

It turns out that Przewalski's horses are actually feral descendants of the first horses that humans are known to have domesticated, around 5,500 years ago.

What's more, the modern horses that people ride today cannot be traced to those early steeds. That means humans must have tamed wild horses once again later on, somewhere else, but no one knows where or when.

Threats Against Schools Increase Since Florida Shooting

Feb 22, 2018

Since last week's school shooting in Parkland, Fla., the number of threats of violence against schools across the country has increased.

Educators School Safety Network says it recorded about 50 threats a day on average since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people were killed.

The Ohio-based national organization that tracks school threats says that compares to about 10 threats a day on average.

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As the Trump administration sees it, U.S. steel and aluminum industries are in crisis, rapidly losing ground to foreign competitors and hemorrhaging jobs along the way.

But proposed import tariffs and quotas have other manufacturers worried that they'll become less competitive in the global marketplace.

How the administration responds to the problem is something Mark Vaughn is watching very closely.

President Trump made coal jobs a core of his presidential campaign, repeatedly vowing to bring back "beautiful" coal despite the industry's decades-long decline. And in pockets of the U.S. during Trump's first year in office, it may well have felt like a turnaround was underway.

A review of data from the Mine Safety and Health Administration shows 1,001 more U.S. coal jobs last year compared with 2016, although energy analysts say the reasons are short term and have nothing to do with White House policies.

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Over the past few months, the roll-out of several high-profile Netflix releases has revealed a predilection for expensive, hard-edged, futuristic genre fare, starting with the human-alien buddy picture Bright, continuing with the TV series Altered Carbon and the surprise post-Super Bowl unveiling of The Cloverfield Paradox. None of them opened to much critical acclaim and Netflix is notoriously cagey about sharing its numbers, but the company has found a niche market that its algorithm can reinforce.

It was no accident that W.E.B. Du Bois called his book The Souls Of Black Folk, says Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped From The Beginning: The Definitive History Of Racist Ideas In America. Du Bois wasn't looking for a catchy title — he was reacting to the reality of his times.

"Racist Americans were making the case that black people did not have souls," Kendi says. "And the beings that did not have souls were beasts."

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Rick Gates, the business partner of Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, is expected to plead guilty to new charges brought against him this week.

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Gates is expected to appear in federal court on Friday afternoon.

For the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims who have fled Myanmar and what authorities describe as a brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing, the prospect of returning to their home villages might be more than just daunting. As satellite photographs show, a return home might be simply impossible.

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Sex worker and activist Juno Mac says the current legislative models for sex work perpetuate a dangerous work environment. She explains the high social costs of letting stigma influence legislation.

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A top official at the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund has announced his resignation following allegations that he engaged in inappropriate behavior during a previous job at the aid organization, Save the Children.

On the day Olga Skripnik fled her home in Crimea, many of her fellow Crimeans were celebrating.

On March 16, 2014, separatist leaders in the Ukrainian province rushed through a referendum on joining Russia in violation of Ukraine's constitution. The controversial measure, which few countries recognized, passed overwhelmingly under the watchful eyes of a Russian occupation force that had seized the Crimean Peninsula two weeks earlier.

The United Nations Security Council is expected to try again on Friday to approve a draft resolution calling for a 30-day ceasefire in Syria.

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