KTEP - El Paso, Texas

GOOD TO GROW: Florist Association Conference

It's all about the flowers! Hosts Denise Rodriguez and John White along with special guest Sabine Green discuss all you need to know about the West Texas New Mexico Florist Association conference. Sabine Green is the New Mexico State Floral Coordinator and the co-chair of the West Texas New Mexico Florist Association.

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***Originally Aired November 27, 2016***

Emmy Pérez is a California-born writer with roots in El Paso.  Her life and career have led her to follow the course of the Rio Grande...from El Paso to the Rio Grande Valley.  Her latest collection, "With the River on Our Face," contains sprawling beautiful poems inspired by the Rio Grande,the surrounding environment, immigration, and borders.  She joins us on this program to tell us more about the collection and read a few poems.

http://www.emmyperez.com/

Aired July 2, 2017

***Original Broadcast Date: February 15, 2015***

Keith & Russ welcome Robert S. Kerbel, senior scientist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.  Kerbel explains how regular chemotherapy for cancer patients often involves a "maximum tolerated dose" of treatment, which often taxes the patient and requires several days of recovery before the next treatment.  With metronomic chemotherapy, researchers hope to lower the dose of drugs and make the dosage more frequent.  

Aired July 23, 2017

***Original Broadcast Date: July 6, 2014***

In a rebroadcast from July 6, 2014, Daniel & guest co-host Nancy Lechuga talk with Mary Szybist, author of Incarnadine, the winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Poetry.  Mary describes Incarnadine as a "religious book for nonbelievers."  She explains why the Annunciation plays such a dominant role in her book, and why "visual poetry" (imagine a poem about an apple written in the shape of an apple), though often seen as gimmicky, was a risk she chose to take for a few of the poems in Incarnadine.  http://maryszybist.net/

Today's Poem of the Week is "Night Shifts at the Group Home" read by Mary Szybist.  It comes from her award-winning collection, Incarnadine.

For today's Poetic License, Nancy Lechuga reads a love letter to humanity.

Aired July 23, 2017

Transfronteriza is a women-led cultural organizing project aimed to empower and support the development of the border community. 

Transfronteriza is creating public dialogues and workshops in visual art, textiles, sound recording and movement where women (and other community members) are invited to create costumes, scenery, movement, sounds, text, images and objects that will then be orchestrated together into performances done in El Paso, Ciudad Juarez, and Albuquerque, NM. 

Paradox Traveling Art is mobile art installation created by El Paso/Juarez artist Laura Turon. This art piece is also presented as the first mobile art gallery in El Paso, housed within a converted school bus.

The artistic concept portrays a mobile art gallery as an art piece itself, one that travels and moves beyond the gallery’s walls. Paradox Traveling Art, makes it debut on Thursday, July 27th during the Last Thursdays Art Crawl in downtown. It will be located outside of the El Paso Museum of Art with a reception inside the Museum of Art. 

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Suspicious that a package shipped from Hong Kong might contain smuggled animals, U.S. agents who opened the package found three live king cobra snakes hidden in potato chip cans. The man who was to receive the package outside Los Angeles has been arrested on federal charges.

Rodrigo Franco, 34, could face 20 years in prison on a charge of illegally importing merchandise, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. U.S. officials accuse him of violating the Endangered Species Act and falsifying records.

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was shot during a congressional baseball practice six weeks ago, has been discharged from a Washington, D.C., hospital and is beginning a period of intensive rehabilitation.

"He is in good spirits and is looking forward to his return to work once he completes rehabilitation," MedStar Washington Hospital Center said in a statement.

Missouri already has some of the strictest abortion laws in the country. Now it's looking to place new requirements on the procedure, including having doctors meet with women seeking abortions before formal consent can be given and requiring the health department to hold unannounced annual inspections of abortion clinics.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated: 9:27 a.m.

President Trump's announcement that he wants to ban transgender people from serving in the military could mean a historic reversal in the Pentagon's long-term trend of lowering barriers to service.

Or it could be a speed bump on a course the Defense Department was already following.

The question in Washington following Trump's post on Twitter Wednesday morning was: Which will it be?

Almost no one other than Trump himself had any idea what he intended when he wrote this:

Newt Gingrich, the former Republican speaker of the House, was on NPR's Morning Edition Wednesday interviewed by Rachel Martin.

Gingrich threw out a lot of allegations, including that the Justice Department is "very liberal" and "anti-Trump"; that Robert Mueller, the former FBI director and now special counselor in charge of the Russia investigation, is biased because of donations to Hillary Clinton from people at his law firm; and that Mueller has hired "killers" to take down Trump.

Senate Republicans have at least narrowed the options on what comes next for the Affordable Care Act — casting two separate votes since Tuesday that knocked out a "repeal-only" proposal and rejected a plan for replacement.

So, as lawmakers resume debate on Thursday, they will be staring at basically one possibility: a so-called "skinny repeal" that would surgically remove some key provisions from Obamacare, while leaving the rest intact — at least for now.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Mon Dieu! Burgundy Snails Aren't French Anymore

2 hours ago

In a large, sparsely furnished room at a food processing plant in the town of Migennes, in France's Burgundy region, three employees prepare large snails for packaging. They take the snails' flesh, which is cooked separately, and put them into shells of the right size. They reconstitute about a thousand snails an hour, says Romain Chapron, the director of Croque Bourgogne, the company that owns this plant and sells a couple million snails each year.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the seven years since the Affordable Care Act was passed, CEOs of U.S. health care companies have made a lot of money.

Their compensation far outstrips the wage growth of nearly all Americans, according to reporter Bob Herman, who published an analysis this week of "the sky-high pay of health care CEOs" for the online news site, Axios.

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Jason Heller is a senior writer at The A.V. Club, a Hugo Award-winning editor and author of the novel Taft 2012.

Los Angeles is the city of many great traditions — one of them being crime fiction. From the hardboiled classics of Raymond Chandler to the gritty noir of James Ellroy, numerous novels have used the tough streets and affluent hills of L.A. as a backdrop for some of literature's most thrilling tales of murder, lust, and justice.

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Most readers these days who know Chester Himes know him for his detective fiction, novels like The Real Cool Killers and Cotton Comes to Harlem, which were written late in his career during the 1950s and '60s. These hard-boiled stories — featuring black New York City police detectives Grave Digger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson — are brutal and wildly surreal. But no more brutal and surreal, Himes may have said, than the situation of being black — even of being a prominent black writer — in mid-20th century America.

This week, our intrepid host Linda Holmes calls in from L.A., where she's attending the Television Critics' Association press tour, to host a discussion of the filthy, freewheeling and very, very funny Girls Trip. She's joined by regular panelist Stephen Thompson, Code Switch's Gene Demby, and special guest Aisha Harris from Slate.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

22 hours ago

For most of the 1990s, Adrian "Stretch" Bartos and Robert "Bobbito" Garcia hosted a famous weekly hip-hop radio show on Columbia University's campus radio station, WKCR. Their no-frills, four-hour show was broadcast during the wee hours of the morning — 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. on Friday mornings — on a low-strength signal that listeners had to be deliberate about searching out.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Rep. Keith Ellison On Trump And The Media

4 hours ago

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